Skin and Bones

CRWBY: Behind the Episode: Skin and Bones

Join CRWBY as they open the studio doors for an in depth look on how each episode was made. Kerry, Miles and the team will walk you through the 3D pipeline and talk about how art, tech, post, and animation come together to create RWBY.

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Comments (65)

  • Klorix FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    2 weeks ago

    Gosh that's a lot of work for one character.

    This made me think of Sienna. That must have been kinda heart breaking for all the artists involved in her design. Still, she was very well done, just as well as all the others.


    Looking forward to see the step from here to actually making them move.

    Keep it up CRWBY!

  • SamAlbro FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    2 weeks ago

    Watched this a few times to check out the Vernal model. The technique used for the whites of her eyes is amazing. I had to jump into Maya and try it out! 

  • quietobserversiena

    2 weeks ago

    Raven is so dramatic and extra I cant tolerate it. And also, im having happy chest pains. 

  • lindlekindle

    2 weeks ago

    There we are all we need now is to add Blake to the mix then we've got RWBY back together! but am I the only one wanting to see a fight between Qrow and Raven just like the one between Qrow and Winter? because I thought that was pretty cool.

  • NoirTitor FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    All of this was really cool and informative for me (I'm currently in a dual enrollment class for 3d design)

  • yairzucker FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Light

    3 weeks ago

    This volume's facial expressions are pretty top notch. I can't recall being so impressed by the facial expressions in any previous volume.

  • PugsRcute0 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    I am just curious, with all of these techniques that take very long of complete, will we still be able to get very fast paced battles? An example of fast paced for me would be when Roman and Sun were fighting at the dock with Sun's gunchucks. I thought Tyrian vs. Qrow was well done last volume; however, that was the only really fast paced fight imo. Volumes 1-3 were packed with crazy battles which I very much enjoyed. What I am worried about is that we will only have one good fight for per season.

    • neonal18 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      The animation team is not the same as it was at the start of RWBY, but I don't doubt they're going to do their best to make all their fights as exciting as they can and paced appropriately for the particular situation or encounter.

    • PacMonster FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      2 weeks ago

      Unfortunately the style of fights that were in Volumes 1-3 (and more-so Volume 1 to 2) is not really conducive to the pipeline RT animation does now. That is to say it wouldn't be impossible to do it's just Monty and Shane were the primary fight choreography animators and it involved a lot of hand crafted animation. Part of the reason why episodes used to be just 5-9 minutes in length is because those fight scenes took up a lot of the animators times to do and if you're producing 15-20 minute episodes a lot more episodes per season you get less time for any individual scene.


      The way I see it is a trade off. We might get less exciting frenetic fight scenes but the overall quality of the animation improves as more industry standard animation techniques are followed. And this can clearly be seen when rewatching volume 1 where simple animations like walk cycles look very rough with characters appearing to float in place at times (that scene of Cinder running on rooftops poorly comes to mind). I had anime purist friends who I tried to introduce to RWBY get completely turned off from the series due to the animation quality. So while the show might lose the epic fight scenes Monty was known for the overall product that he created is still better for it because the quality has gone up in all other areas.

    • Klorix FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      2 weeks ago

      @PacMonster

      I'm definitely not an expert, but they are still using mocap, right? With that CRWBY should be able to 'simply' film the action and import the exciting fight choreography into Maya. That would make for quality animation and cool fights. Or am I getting it all wrong?

    • tanukivilla FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      2 weeks ago

      @Klorix
      Pretty sure they are still using mocap and thus they could import the fight choreography into Maya.  They'd still have to clean it up and add all the non-mocap parts (facial animation, fingers, props, etc...), but it shouldn't be much different than what Monty was doing in Poser previously, especially since I think most animators find Poser harder to use.  However, cleaning up action animation, even mocapped action animation, takes a long time to make sure the timing and "impact" of everything is correct.

      I think the point PacMonster was making was that with the increased episode times currently as compared to the earlier seasons doing intense fight sequences would eat up a lot of CRWBY's production budget and schedule, so they simplified the fight choreography.  If they hired more animators or took longer per episode then they could do it, but that would cost a lot more.  So the problem isn't that it can't be done, just that it's not affordable, especially if they want the quality of the rest of the animation and production to remain high.

    • Klorix FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      2 weeks ago

      @tanukivilla

      Yeah, you're probably right. Cleaning-up processes and tuning the details always is time consuming. I'm sure they will give it that extra effort when it's important.


      Although I do enjoy a nicely choreographed fight scene, I'm much more curious about the story at the moment. I never complained about the animation and will just continue enjoying the show.

  • ctaekotemple FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    I have a couple questions (excuse me for being a total pleb, I just have zero experience with animating anything ;) )

    Once you have the character all "skinned and boned," as well as colored and everything, the animators can just use that finalized character for any scene in the show without having to re-animate unless there's a change in clothing, or the character has scratches from injuries, or a haircut, or what have you, correct?  When you do make those changes, do you have to start over from the beginning or can you adjust the character model as needed?

    • ElfMellon FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      In the case of Weiss's "soot patch" this episode (6), it's possibly just a change in the texture, in which case if they're lucky it maps on fine to the existing animation. There's a good chance they have to at least intervene in some way for most changes. If it's something like Yang's arm being gone, or a gash with visible depth, they probably have to redo "from scratch" that area of the animation.

    • tanukivilla FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      It all depends on what is going on, but usually you just adjust the base rig rather than creating a new one from scratch.  As long as proportions don't change (not just the size of the character but the length from knee to ankle, shoulder to elbow, etc...) then you can use the same rig for everything.

      RWBY uses a mocap pipeline and most mocap software, like HumanIK,
      allows for animation to be transferred despite rig proportion
      differences.  In other words, one mocap animator could use the same base
      rig for all the characters, despite their different proportions, and
      then just transfer the animation from one to the other using something
      like ATOM.


      If the change is just cosmetic, like soot or blood, then that's just a texture change to the model and doesn't require any rig changes.  But again, it depends on the model and how it is broken up into pieces.  If they cut Yang's hair short, they could just take the base rig, swap the model for the hair, re-skin the new hair mesh piece, and save off a new file called "Yang_ShortHair" in an hour or so.  If hair gets longer, then they'd have to add more joints to the base rig to animate the new longer hair mesh, which would take much more time.

      Not sure if they use this, but there is a thing in 3D animation called "additive animations".  These are animations added on top of the original, base animation.  So let's say they animate Weiss on the base rig.  Then, in another scene, she his wearing a coat and a hairpiece.  Both of those could be animated as additives and blended into the original animation.  The same with the longer hair I talked about above.  In short, you'd have a base rig and an additive rig that is basically either the base plus any additional clothing or just the additional clothing that gets parented to the base later on.  Either way the only additional work is just skinning those new, extra pieces.  The alternative is to rig and skin each model/clothing change entirely, but that's a lot more work.

      For something like Yang losing an arm, that's a whole new model.  But again, if the proportions are the same, they can just re-use the same rig, however the skinning would change for that area.  So 90-95% of Yang would be the same skinning and you could just transfer it from one model to the other, but the arm would be different.  Having joints not skinned doesn't really cause any problems, it's just extra data but since this is film those few extra kilobytes don't matter.  In other words, they could use the same rig on a new model and just skin it differently for missing limbs.

    • jhakaro FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      They can't use this finalised character for any scene in the show without having to "re-animate." Every shot they do, where the character has to act a certain way, they have to still animate it to do those things. There are ways to drop in and re-use animation or make shortcuts in how you go about doing so but they still have to animate the characters doing whatever they're doing at the time. Animation is the movement of the characters, bringing the characters to life. Nothing in this video was animation. Just rigging it so that it is able to move and deform properly, then it is passed onto animators to animate the character for each scene. 

      I think what you mean is if they can just use the same rig and model for the whole show? In that case, yes they can. There might be some cases where problems arise and sometimes a model might not have a nude base model, in other words, the clothes, shoes etc. are actually part of the character and can't be separated or can but what's under the clothes might not be a proper model, in other words, remove the shoes and there might be stumps or feet with no toes as they didn't think they were needed as they never change clothes. In this case, they'd have to create a new model or even with a good base model, they'd still need to model the new outfit and make sure it deforms correctly and collides with solid objects rather than passing through the model, often known as clipping. Most scratches and bruises and other minor altercations, dirt, wet etc. is usually done with textures and shaders. 

    • ctaekotemple FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      2 weeks ago

       simple_smileThanks ElfMellon, tanukivilla, jhakaro!  I know that because I'm so unfamiliar with the terminology involved, I may not have framed my question in the best way, but you guys gave some great and easy to understand answers. 

  • dpla FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    This video is painfully nostalgic for me.  It was a class assignment, and it's three months of rigging in tandem of blending skin is frustrating just to get that 10-second looping animation of a 3D character model BARELY right.

  • SeveRM FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    That face animation sliders are really cool :) Can I ask, regarding talking and stuff like that, is that also done with the sliders or do you mocap a face for that? And is that while the voice actor is talking, or is it done separately?

    • tanukivilla FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      As far as I'm aware, they don't do facial mocap and just do the lip sync by hand.  If they do, then it would be while the voice actor is talking because otherwise the mocap actor would have to lip sync to the voice actor which is difficult.

    • Jarrett_Blumenschein FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold RT Software Engineer

      3 weeks ago

      Tanukivilla is right we don't currently do any facial mocap for RWBY. 

    • SeveRM FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      2 weeks ago

      @tanukivilla @Jarrett_Blumenschein Thank you!

  • gem_scheltema FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold RTBox reviews each month

    3 weeks ago

    And I think my life is hard...this shit is mind boggling. Just knowing that it is this much work increases my respect for the CRWBY tenfold. At least when I'm watching it, I know I appreciate how great the facial animations are now, because that's someone's life (or part of their life) work. And everyone is doing a spectacular job.

  • Zummerz FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    From making the model through rigging, how long does it take to make a single character?

  • Lt-Waffles FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    every time there's a CRWBY BTS, I find something new to inspire me. 

  • Arrisay FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    This looks so freaking hard, they're doing amazing work, and it's so easy to take it for granted since we're so used to anime characters moving and looking certain ways. I just wonder how many CRWBY members actually worked on anime before or if they've just been picking this up as they go.

    • hypeathon FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      I hate to be that guy, but how many of the members of CRWBY have actually worked on anime may depend on what your definition of anime is.


      That said, I personally don't want to get caught in the semantics debate, so I''ll just say that many of the staff are taking a lot of notes from anime.

    • tanukivilla FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      You can look the team up on LinkedIn to see their backgrounds and previous work experiences.

    • jhakaro FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      Most of them have probably never worked on any anime before or anything really resembling one in any way as most anime are made in the east, Japan, Korea, Phillipines and lately some in China I think but of course, most notably Japan, the origin of anime. Anime shows or "anime-esque" shows (whichever you prefer, it literally makes no difference) made in both the east and the west are usually 2d, hand drawn, frame by frame animations, generally 24 frames per second on 2's or often 3's or 4's, meaning there's 24 drawings seen in a single second but there's only a new one seen every 2, 3 or 4 drawings (or beyond if strapped on budget and time or experimental). The drawings occur so fast that you don't see the fact that one drawing is repeated twice, three times or four times etc. 

      This however is 3d animation, still generally done at 24fps but the process is entirely different and a lot more technical. It's often more efficient in 3d programs to animate or make backgrounds in the end but has a lot of front loading, meaning there is a lot of work involved before you can get to the point where it becomes faster and more efficient than 2d. Background characters or characters that appear for one scene, cough... cough... are particularly troublesome in 3d as they take so much work to set up whereas in 2d it's often quicker to just draw them in the background though still a lot of work. For a long running show such as Rwby though, and especially with sets and characters that will be revisited over and over, 3d becomes very efficient. And you can place the camera's in and experiment trying to get the perfect shot of the scene and edit and cut them together. The animation plays out as normal, cameras can move around the 3d world as if it was actually there (whereas in anime, (though many use 3d background techniques now) they would have to paint a new background for every shot (reusing when possible) and make long sweeping layouts to mimic a 3d space for camera moves or animate the background itself in certain cases) taking multiple perspectives of the same animation all at once.

      In 2d, every shot you see has to be hand tailored by the storyboarder/layout artist and animator to mimic the camera and the cuts and rarely do they experiment past the storyboarding phase as it takes so long to do and would be so much wasted work. In 3d, they have the freedom to change up the angles without much bother and to choose from multiple perspectives capturing the action, especially good for quick moving fight scenes etc. Though even then I think they generally stick to storyboards for a cohesive vision but the option is there.

      Both have pros and cons and one isn't necessarily harder or better than another, just different tools. Simply depends on what you prefer or are interested in. But this type of animation is rarely seen in most anime.

  • PacMonster FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    The "usually after a few hours" joke was pretty much the process of weight painting. Which to people who don't know the rigging/skinning process, weight painting means assigning different "weights" or influences to how much of the mesh is impacted by the rig movement. When you saw the rigger select the entire skeleton and say "bind skin" that gives the entire mesh the default weights to every bone. Meaning that 100% of the adjacent mesh to the bone is moved along with the rig. This is why you saw that odd elbow crinkle and why even after the "fixed" version it still looked a little off. Weight painting is extremely difficult to get perfect.

    • neonal18 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      Amen my friend. It gets especially bad when the default Bind Skin sets things up so that moving the left arm moves parts of the right leg or crazy things like that, or when altering the weight one bone has on the vertices impacts the weight of others in an undesirable way. Respect to the people who essentially go through the whole process as their JOB.

    • tanukivilla FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      There are ways to make the default bind better by having your default weights be more localized and less broad by adjusting your settings, using a heat map, or a blank character that has default weights and then transferring weights, but you'll almost always have to do some cleanup.  The other problem is that different animators have different ideas about how things should move and deform, especially for the face.  You can also use Prune Weights to help out with stray weighting.

  • PureMatty FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    i love crwby

  • planl FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    @giofcoutinho thanks for showing so much of your process and coming here to answer questions about it. You're awesome.

    • giofcoutinho FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold RT Rigging Artist

      3 weeks ago

      Awh thank you!! c:

  • MintyMido FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold MintyMido

    3 weeks ago

    Love seeing the work going into facial expressions - I think in terms of RWBY's animation evolution the increased range of expression in the characters is what has stood out to me the most - its gorgeous!

  • albinolass FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    Very interesting!

  • Bastionus FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    OMG the work that goes into this, is insane! Thank you so much for your hard work!

  • LazarouDave FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Can't afford Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    The true face of Awe...or something

    wHpEp0R.png

  • the_albino FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    As someone not familiar with Pencil, what are the advantages of switching over to 3DS Max to use it versus creating the look with Maya's various surface or "toon" shaders and toon outline FX?

    • TimDReed FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      We went with Pencil mainly because it gives us better control over how and where specific lines draw on each character. Pencil also did a better job of drawing lines with our meshes being smoothed at render. 

  • neonal18 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    OH BOY GOTTA LOVE RIGGING AND SKINNING.


    In all honesty they're fun processes in that you get to see how the characters will eventually come to life. It's just SO MUCH FINE-TUNING. I'm working on an animation right now and it's cool to see that you guys used a Blend Shape workflow for the facial expressions like I've been, though I never would have thought of using a panel of shapes and driven keys to control them! Then again that's probably how most people with more training than I have in Maya would handle it- just going through the attributes or Blend Shapes window would be too technical and monotonous. Glad I saw this before the actual animation I have to do so I can try that for myself!

    As for modeling, I definitely want to sharpen my skills in that as well, even if animating is where my heart truly lies. It's just that I need to get more used to organic modeling for humans and stuff, and I'm not great at making textures either. But that's why we keep working- to get better!


    Once again, thank you guys so much for these videos. They're cool, inspiring, and helpful all rolled into one! Something that was brought up in the last episode and again in this one, though- working in both Maya and 3ds Max for the characters. You mention the Pencil plugin helping to get the cel-shaded look right for them while the environment lighting is all done in Maya. Does the Pencil-ed model get exported from Max to Maya and still retain the look? Are(god forbid)the environments and characters rendered separately? I'm sure there's definite cross-compatibility between them since they're both Autodesk products, but I'm still scratching my head a bit. I might be going a bit too deep down the rabbit hole here into stuff you can't really share, but I'm curious to know.

    • TimDReed FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      We don't export the character back to Maya after it's in Max. We do animate the non-Pencil character in Maya though, along with the environment. We then cache that animation and hook the cached data up to the character in Max, allowing us to render with Pencil there. The environments are rendered separately in Maya using a renderer called Redshift, then everything is put together in Comp. Hope that helps/makes some sort of sense! 

    • neonal18 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      Ah, okay, so the two ARE rendered separately. It doesn't sound quite as agonizing as I thought it might've been, though. Hearing all that definitely makes sense to me! Thanks!

    • tanukivilla FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      Out of curiosity, why do you cache the animation and not just export an FBX?  Is the character in Max using a different rig or something?

  • PurdyCoolz FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    the fact that i am in school for this kind of stuff, and getting to see how its done in regards to RWBY makes me so happy! it also gives me a greater appreciation for how much time and care go into the skinning process, as it can be quiet difficult to get the mesh weights to bend how you want them too

  • finyte FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Shut Up Donnie!

    3 weeks ago

    Great episode as always guys! And here's a question, about how much time does it take to completely model and rig a character? 

    • giofcoutinho FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold RT Rigging Artist

      3 weeks ago

      How long it takes to rig a character depends on how complex they are - simpler characters such as Illia (who has nothing hanging off her outfit) probably take 2 - 3 days at most, but more complex ones such as Yang can take a couple of weeks to complete

    • TimDReed FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      Modeling and texturing a character usually takes anywhere from 5 to 10 days, depending on how complex the design is.

  • AeroJett FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Spaceman

    3 weeks ago

    Seeing the head geometries for expressions trailing off to a vanishing point gave me flashbacks to older computers and fears of crashing. Thank goodness we live in the future. Now my computer only lags with large, fancy Photoshop brushes.

  • freeoisformeo FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    I wonder if they bothered to make the big smiling face rig for Raven. Imagining that big toothy grin on her face is... unsettling.

    • giofcoutinho FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold RT Rigging Artist

      3 weeks ago

      We always try to make sure all characters look good with all face shapes just in case they're necessary!

    • extragarb FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      I just love the thought of stoic characters like Salem or Hazel making big goofy faces

  • JediRalts FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    It is so cool to be able to look at this and actually know what they're talking about. All these semesters of learning modelling and animation at college are starting to pay off!

  • Wadcroft FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Shameless Fiction Writer

    3 weeks ago

    Digital action figures to play with!


    It's amazing to see how this has an almost industrial air to it. It's gone from just a few people working on it to a complete production line. On the one hand, this makes it easier for the creators to put the story from inside their heads to the screen. But on the other hand, I can see why someone like Monty would have hated this way of working, because there's a risk of it becoming soulless. The sense of handcrafting grows less.

    • PacMonster FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      Monty's approach is good but impossible to scale. There's a reason why the first volume of RWBY had episodes that were between 5-9 minutes in length and why there wasn't what would be considered a full season's worth of episodes. Because Monty's approach to animation is very time intensive. I mean the amount of time it would take to story board and animate one of Monty's style of fights with RT's new workflow would be like a month per episode. So it comes down to what do you want in your content? Shorter episodes and less of them with more handcrafted elements or more episodes that fill out a more traditional seasonal arc?

  • Iamericamd

    3 weeks ago

    I'm just constantly in awe of how much work goes into RWBY, it's amazing to see just a glimpse of what CRWBY does to make such a great show. 

  • Zahlen FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Danger Noodle Animator

    3 weeks ago

    SKINNING AND RIGGING. I HATE IT. Also what do you use for the auto rig? It doesn't look like Advanced Skeleton.

    Also, once again, as an aspiring animator from a team of artists inspired by Monty Oum, RWBY, and Roosterteeth, thank you for all the work that you do and for providing this resource for people like me.

    • giofcoutinho FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold RT Rigging Artist

      3 weeks ago

      It's a proprietary auto-rig!

  • cherylcherelle FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold V5 HYPE

    3 weeks ago

    Vernal! Now this chapter will be good.

    • LazarouDave FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Can't afford Double Gold

      3 weeks ago

      Well...if she actually did anything...

  • YoBoySarge FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold You just got sarged

    3 weeks ago

    This is the part of sfm I couldn't figure out on my own

    • lazykittycat

      3 weeks ago

      What's sfm?

    • Zahlen FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Danger Noodle Animator

      3 weeks ago

      @lazykittycat Source Film Maker

  • lazykittycat

    3 weeks ago

    hey! First one here again! And it's ironic, because I'm not even a first member! Woohoo!