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zacturner917
First Computer Build!CASE: Thermaltake LV 10 GT Snow Edition
MOBO: ASUS Sabertooth 990FX AM3+
CPU: AMD FX-8150 3.6GHz 8Core
GPU: 1x Sapphire Radeon 7870 (can I Crossfire this with my existing 7850?)
HDD: 2x WD Caviar Black 2TB 7200RPM HDD
SSD: Samsung 830 seriews 64GB SSD
PSU: Corsair Gaming series GS800W Modular power supply
RAM: G.Skill Ares series 16GB (4x4GB) 1600 DDR3
SPU: Creative Sound-blaster X-FI Soundcard
OS: WIN7 Ultimate / WIN8 (if it is out when I purchase all these things)

Is all this compatible? Are there any tips so that I can not sell my right arm for this computer? I plan to do a lot of graphics editing and 3d modeling with this computer. Is it true that Intel is better then AMD in that respect? Actually any tips at all would be nice.
#1  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
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ElijahC
All parts are compatible, if you are going to be using this PC for 3D modeling and other rendering aspects, I see no problem.

Your GPU question: You can not crossfire different GPUs. You can only crossfire 2x 7850 or 2x 7870, the GPU itself HAS to be the same. Same thing goes for Nvidia cards, so you can not SLI a 550ti and a 560ti but you CAN SLI 2x 550ti cards.

Intel vs. AMD, it's preference. Intel's core i7 has a feature called "hyper threading" that technically splits the 4 cores into 8 threads, so it's 4 cores and 4 virtual cores combined but AMDs 8150 is 8 cores. I own an Intel system myself and I have not been able to fully test and play with an AMD 8xxx nor a 6xxx so I can't justify their performance first hand!

If I were you, I would just use Win7, Win8 won't be fully optimized for gaming/modeling programs at first and to be honest I think Win8 will be the new Vista(which in my opinion Vista sucks).

tl;dr All your parts are compatible, you can not crossfire your 7850 with your future 7870.
#2  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
WindowsRules
In reply to zacturner917, #1:
GPU: 1x Sapphire Radeon 7870 (can I Crossfire this with my existing 7850?)
- I am no expert as far as graphics cards are concerned but I do not believe that you can Crossfire two dissimilar graphics cards

I am unaware of your budget but I do believe that it is worth getting a much bigger SSD. I can appreciate that it is cheaper but trust me you'll be surprised how quickly you'll fill 64GBs. I have a 128GB SSD and at the moment I only have <=30GBs free capacity.
SSDs by OCZ like the OCZ Technology 120GB Vertex 2 Series SATA-300 3.5" Solid State Drive (OCZSSD3-2VTX120G) have received good reviews.

#3  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote  |  + 1 Ditto
Samutz is Glitched
You should be able to Crossfire the cards.
Source: sites.amd.com/us/game/technology/Pages/cros...
#4  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
zacturner917
In reply to ElijahC, #2:

I had figured more cores the better as far as graphics editing. Unless I am mistaken it will share the load between the cores resulting in better response times. I also do believe that AMD has this as well (though they call it Hyper transit or something like that) My old Phenom II x4 945 showed 8 cores instead of the 4 that it actually had.

I guess Ill just stick with the 7850 for now, It should be enough, if it isn't well, I can add another one when I wish to.

In reply to WindowsRules, #3:

I actually found a 256GB for relatively cheap (as far as SSD are concerned, so I am going that route (instead of the 64 GB)
#5  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
WindowsRules
In reply to zacturner917, #5:
I actually found a 256GB for relatively cheap (as far as SSD are concerned, so I am going that route (instead of the 64 GB)
- Yep, I'd do that. Sometimes I keep forgetting how fast time flies and that my SSD is now over a year old. Still it is enough for me at the moment, so I won't bother buying a new one (yet). How much did the 256GB SSD that you found cost?

R.e. cores; I agree with you: I also believe that more cores is better for graphics editing. I am currently unaware of the advantages that the more modern AMD CPUs have over the new generation Intel processors but I'd say that since the AMD CPUs are so much cheaper that the arguments between each other more or less cancel each other out. That being said I am biased as all my computers have Intel CPUs and each one of them is an absolute beast (apart from my Celeron E3300, lol)
#6  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
iRawrz Sponsor
In reply to zacturner917, #5:

Not really. A good i7 will blow that chip out of the water easily for graphic editing. Even an i5 2500k overclocked would do better. The bulldozer chips are not as good as they were expected to be.
#7  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
WindowsRules
In reply to iRawrz, #7:

Really? I think that is interesting. I have a i7 2600k and I cannot fault it but I have also used an Phenom X6 (which isn't as new as the one you're talking about) and I can't fault that either. Then again the only one that I have have ever truly thrashed is the i7, I have never had an opportunity to really push a new AMD processor. Is the difference really marketable?

Then again the i7 is fantastic, but it is also fantastically expensive. I suppose that what I am saying is the price difference is worth it for zacturner917's new PC?
#8  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
zacturner917
In reply to WindowsRules, #8:

I am curious about that as well. I can get the 8150 for about 200 dollars, Whilst the other chip I was looking at was a 2700k and a 3770k, both are over 50% more expensive.
#9  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
WindowsRules
In reply to zacturner917, #9:

I suppose it is all to do with how much money you can spend; if you have enough - buy an i7 if you don't then get a decent AMD Processor. Unless there is a unanimous verdict that says things like if you're doing rendering then a Phenom X6 is best where as if you're doing photo-editing then use a i7, etc (guaranteed to be wrong on that - just an example.)
#10  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
zacturner917
Well, so far I have the PSU and graphics card, I still am debating on the processor and such though, I cant complain at all though, AMD's newest beast for about 200 bucks isn't bad. I must say though, building my computer is alot better than buying it all at once, for two reason. 1) I dont have to spend it all at once :P 2) I REALLY get to know my stuff about my build.
#11  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
WindowsRules
In reply to zacturner917, #11:
:P 2) I REALLY get to know my stuff about my build.
- that is a extremely good approach to doing it. What is even better in my opinion is doing a LOT of research whilst saving up and then getting everything all at once. However when i did that it turned out that I needed a new TV card as well which put me over-budget. Still never mind, eh?
#12  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
zacturner917
In reply to WindowsRules, #12:


- that is a extremely good approach to doing it. What is even better in my opinion is doing a LOT of research whilst saving up and then getting everything all at once. However when i did that it turned out that I needed a new TV card as well which put me over-budget. Still never mind, eh?

I suppose it is all down to personal preference though, as for me, I am terrible at saving money, so the only way that this can actually happen is if I buy it piece by piece. And I am still doing my re-search haha.
#13  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
iRawrz Sponsor
In reply to zacturner917, #13:

I'd suggest posting your build onto www.reddit.com/r/buildapc . They will definately send you in the right directions as far as parts go.

The 800W PSU might be a little overkill. If you haven't opened it yet or got it at a good deal, I'd look into returning it and getting a 600W PSU.
#14  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
Qwertyman42 Sponsor
The old Phenom IIs tend to hold better overall than the Bulldozer FX line. Get a Phenom II Quad or Hex-core, or see if you can fit a quad-core i5 or i7 Sandy Bridge build into your budget. AMD has kinda focused on the people that want good performance at a good price, not the highest performance at a higher price, and it tends to hurt them, especially now that Ivy Bridge is coming and I'm sure we will see more options there in the next months, which is dropping the Nehalem and Sandy Bridge prices to where they are more price/performance value than the AMD chips themselves. An i3 dual-core outperforms a Phenom II 940 (quad core) at stock, and when both are overclocked to a maximum stable level (the Phenom overclocks much better) they perform at about the same level overall.

Also, keep the higher PSU, especially if you want to crossfire/SLI or upgrade/add in extra fans/HDD/SSD/other cards in the future. Extra headroom is always good, and not all PSUs are rated at their max continuously. I have an 850w PSU to make sure I can upgrade in the future, since these new GPUs tend to suck up more and more power.

Oh, and with the reputation Creative's sound cards have gotten recently, I would recommend picking up an ASUS, Diamond, or HT Omega soundcard. I have an ASUS DS 7.1 card and it does quite well, since my onboard audio is basically shot.

Post edited 5/24/12 3:42PM
#15  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
iRawrz Sponsor
In reply to Qwertyman42, #15:

I forgot about him doing SLI/crossfire.

If you are even thinking about doing that keep the PSU.
#16  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote  |  + 1 Cool
zacturner917
I am thinking about it, Plus for the sake of future upgrades I wanted excess power regardless.

Soo, whats the difference between Z68 and Z77, I have decided to go from AMD to INTEL 2700k for the processor and I am just trying to find out if the Price gap for the Z77 is worth the extra 50 bucks.
#17  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
ElijahC
Differences between the Z68 and the Z77;

Z68;
-Support for PCI-E 2.0
-Sandy Bridge Natively

Z77;
-Support for PCI-E 3.0
-Ivy Bridge Natively

If you are going for a Sandy Bridge CPU then go for a Z68. if you are going for a Ivy Bridge then go for the Z77. So unless you are planning on upgrading to a GPU that has PCI-E 3.0 then just go for the Z68. It's smart to go with the i7 either Sandy or Ivy Bridge version as both support hyper-threading which will be great for your editing and modeling.

So in the end, for your current build, the Z77 is not worth the extra $50.
#18  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote  |  + 2 Cool
iRawrz Sponsor
In reply to zacturner917, #17:

Not much. Some of the newer z68 boards support PCI-E 3.0, but none of that matters if you aren't using an Ivy Bridge processor. In all honesty, stick with a z68 if you aren't going to upgrade to an i7 3770k.

If you are going with a z68 board, look at the ASRock z68 Extreme3 Gen3. That will give you PCI-E 3.0 if you choose to upgrade eventually to an Ivy Bridge processor.
#19  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
zacturner917
That is very helpful thank you both. I think I will go with the Z77 however, Sure the board I want is more expensive but, It allows me more upgrade options, or at least that I was I a deducing from what you said.
#20  Posted 2 years ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
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