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bob20021 Sponsor
Microphone QuestionsHello community!

This is my very first time posting on the forums (as long as i can remember at least.) I just had some basic questions about microphones being used for recording video at the same time (just like the achievement hunter guys do.) what kind of mics do they use? are they expensive? if so is there an alternatively cheaper option for just a noobie? Thanks for the answers in advance!

:D
#1  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
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ScorchRSH Sponsor
Well i'm not sure exactly what they use but some good ones are the blue yeti (around 50-70 USD) and blue snowball (around 70-100 USD), i think ray and michael use the snowball on there person channels. I use the turtlebeach x12 (i think 50-60 USD) headset if you wanna hear what it sounds like watch a video on www.youtube.com/ScorchRSH most if not all my videos have voice over.
#2  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
Bman Brad
In reply to bob20021, #1:

A really good one that professional youtubers use(such as Syndicate) are the blue yeti's. A bit expensive, but you can't beat the quality
#3  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
ChickTastic Sponsor
I'm just starting my channel and I got the Blue Snowball myself. I can tell you it has been fantastic so far and all the research I did for it I didn't find any negative reviews on it. You do have to tune it so it doesn't pick up on background noise because it is a quality mic. But that should really be done on any recording device to make sure you aren't blasting your recordings. I have a Mac and so there were no drivers, it was plug in and go. I don't have my channel up yet for you to hear it because my El Gato is giving me some issues for the game capture.

Good luck!
#4  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
SilverKM03 Sponsor
For years, people have been touting the Blue Snowball as the end all be all for low budget recording. I'm not an audiophile or anything, but what does the Blue Snowball afford you that a traditional microphone does not? I'm sure it's a niche market, but there are things that concern me about it. Can you multi track if you had two or do you need a separate computer? Does it lay the audio down with your video tracks or are you running two programs at once?
#5  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
Bman Brad
In reply to SilverKM03, #5:

the name is pretty cool... that's all i got
#6  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
tuxedojerich Sponsor
In reply to SilverKM03, #5:
For years, people have been touting the Blue Snowball as the end all be all for low budget recording. I'm not an audiophile or anything, but what does the Blue Snowball afford you that a traditional microphone does not? I'm sure it's a niche market, but there are things that concern me about it. Can you multi track if you had two or do you need a separate computer? Does it lay the audio down with your video tracks or are you running two programs at once?

Well, it being a condenser mic is the big thing, as condenser mics tend to have a better quality over dynamic mics.. Most high end recording studios use condensers for the quality of the recordings. Blue is a good and known brand, but there are others AudioTechnica is a good one (a lot of theatrical companies use their mic systems), and there is Shure (tho I am not sure of the products and if they have condensers or not). Blue is also good because they have USB condensers mics available, which is what most people would use for youtube and video work... I know the Audio Technia AT-2020 has both USB and XLR (the kind of mic connection that uses the three prongs) versions.
#7  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote  |  + 1 Cool
MDeBlasi
I'm almost 99% certain AH uses Audio Technica Microphones, as do I. I bought my 2 AT2035s as a set for about $150 each on amazon, but apparently they no longer offer the set (that I can find). It came with the mics, the shock mount, a pop filter and an XLR cable, so all you needed to buy separately was an audio interface.

www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002T45X1G/ref=oh_details_o04_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true\

Cheaper alternatives are blue snowball microphones, but having a microphone that is a USB, regardless if its a condenser or not, is not real audio. My professor always says to me, "Any schmuck can buy a USB microphone, but real audio comes through an XLR." I'm not saying those microphones are bad because they are good for what they are worth. All I'm saying is, if you want the most control over your audio, and if you like sound like me, XLR condensers are the way. Audio Technica has cheaper microphones than the 2035, but it really depends on how much you want to spend, and how much control you want over your sound.
#8  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote  |  + 1 Cool
SilverKM03 Sponsor
In reply to MDeBlasi, #8:
My professor always says to me, "Any schmuck can buy a USB microphone, but real audio comes through an XLR."

I worked with an audio engineer on a project last year - very dedicated guy. Sold me on Senheiser (ME67), though I don't know enough about audio to get the best out of it. He actually said that any XLR isn't enough, that they need to have a specific brand of component within the connector to get the best out of your audio. If that's the case, I can't imagine what degradation you'd get out of USB.
#9  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
IsaiahFilmz
Yea the microphones they use are defininntly really expensive. if you want a good mic just get a bluesnowball they are only $100 dollars or if you want a really good one a blue Yeti is $250
#10  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote  |  + 1 Ditto
Bman Brad
In reply to IsaiahFilmz, #10:

totally agree
#11  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
Desdenne
xD Right now im using a cut up turtle beach head set mounted on a box to be stand a lone. Works for me! ^^ Sometimes the cheaper option is better if you're just having fun!
Though if you have some subscribers and quite a bit of views things like Blue Yeti and Snowballs are popular.
#12  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
MDeBlasi
In reply to IsaiahFilmz, #10:

not necessarily. If you are only talking about the microphone, mine were only $150 a piece, but you need an interface. They can range from different prices.
#13  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
LunchBoxHero
This thread makes me wish I had money. *Sigh*
#14  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
MoreThanLuck
Blue Snowball, the Blue Yeti or anything Audio Technica like the Audio Technica AT-2020 would be more than sufficient.
#15  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
FlippyTriks Sponsor
I bought my Blue Snowball(that I use on my channel) for 60 bucks and it does a great job for the money, but I'm looking at upgrading to Audio-Technica. It costs more but it is so crisp, it's definitely worth it in my book.
#16  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
Hoagie117
A Blue Snowball will work fine for simple applications, but you need to ask yourself if you want a microphone that's easy to use (with moderately good quality), or if you want a microphone that takes some time to learn, produces high quality, and opens up an avenue of learning that will lead to a superior level of quality and control over your audio in the future. It's not cheap, or easy, but over time, it's well worth it.
#17  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
zootesoote
In the same way that megapixels doesn't guarantee picture quality, I would say price doesn't always guarantee audio quality. Here are two examples of work I've done:

Here is a game preview, recorded on a Blueberry, by blue ( www.amazon.com/Blue-Microphones-Blueberry-Co... )

Preview www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALYDmI8VJXM

And this is some voice over I did using a zoomhandy h4 ( www.amazon.com/Zoom-ZOO-H4-Handy-Recorder/dp... )

Voice Over: www.youtube.com/watch?v=_DLIhYzNQsY

There is a slight difference in quality, but considering the h4 is a quarter the price, I'm happy. The fact is, you can get a consumer level microphone that sounds decent, but it is all the other elements that really determine how the end product sounds. For example, both of these recordings were done in a whisper room sound booth, and even more importantly, they were treated using my preference in plugins: nectar and ozone. If people hear whatever you intend to make, they will for sure be more bothered if you have a noisy background, or a big echo, if you didn't give yourself a low and high shelf in the eq, if you didn't notch some chirps, maybe even if you didn't throw a little compression on it. What I mean to say, is that you can get a $20 mic, and really put the effort into the recording and treatment of the audio, and end up with something that sounds better than a $20,000 mic recorded outside, on the side of a highway.
#18  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
Widger98
To answer the OP's question about what mic they use, I am pretty sure it is the audio-technica at2020. The stand I believe they said that it was just one that a local music store sold, and I would guess the same with the pop filter. Maybe I am mixing up roosterteeth mic stories, so don't quote me on the stand/pop filter thing, but I am still almost for certain that the mice is a at2020
#19  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
Widger98
In reply to Widger98, #19:

Wait, now that I take a closer look, they are the at2050's, not the 2020's. Sorry for the confusion!
#20  Posted 1 year ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
ZackMcLennan
snowball mics are $50 now
www.amazon.com/dp/B006DIA77E/ref=wl_it_dp_o_...
#21  Posted 5 months ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
SageSkaaning
In reply to MDeBlasi, #8:

AT2020's are the New Ones From Audio Technica.
#22  Posted 3 months ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
piggymoose
In reply to bob20021, #1:

We recently started up a gaming channel, and we use the t.bone SC 440. Its mainly used for music recording but it works really well for lets plays and podcasts. Its not too expensive too.

Heres a link: www.thomann.de/ie/the_tbone_sc440_usb_podcas...
#23  Posted 3 months ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
darethejacka
I use the Blue Yeti.
#24  Posted 3 months ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
0055k
Man, it all just comes down to your funding and your investment level. How committed are you to making content? If you're not sure if you really want to commit, don't invest into a huge professional microphone - you can always get a better mic, but you can't get wasted money back.
#25  Posted 3 months ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
Cole_Downs
In reply to Bman, #3:

blue yeti isn't even an xlr mic its not that high quality
#26  Posted 3 months ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
Widger98
In reply to Cole_Downs, #26:

It is still pretty professional in the youtube community. A lot of popular commentators use the blue yeti. Most people seem to get the usb version, but they do make a xlr version of it. I'm not for sure if it costs more, though.
#27  Posted 3 months ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
HeyMcFly
I can only speak from experience, but if you're looking for a good quality mic that's relatively cheap, this is the best one I've used so far. A Samson Go Mic, it's very small and lightweight (it will literally fit in your pocket) but the quality is high and there's three setting directly on it for cardioid, -10db and room capture. It's only real drawback is that it's USB operated, but if you're recording near your computer it shouldn't be a problem.

If you scroll down to the comment section on the Amazon page there are some video reviews that show the mic in action. Being someone who uses it on a regular basis, I highly recommend it. It's very doubtful that many guys including AH use it, but I'm not even using it at an optimum usage (good acoustics, setup equipment and a top software) and I get good quality out of it. One thing it's especially good for? No background noise.
#28  Posted 2 months ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
darethejacka
Blue Yeti has four separate settings depending on your position from the microphone, too. Two Best Friends Play use one microphone between all of their videos and podcasts without a pop filter. The Blue Yeti is, by no means, a cheaply-made piece of plastic. There are also a million adapters out there to turn the microphone into something more than just a USB microphone. As stated before, there is an XLR version of it too.

Long story short, Blue Yeti should be considered industry minimum standard in terms of functionality. There are others out there that have the same specs, so shop around, but the Blue microphones are not cheap, nor are they a waste of money, and are of high quality.
#29  Posted 2 months ago  |  Reply  |  Quote
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