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Bob Dylan

Posts (151)

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2181542 - 13 years ago

    As long as they don't touch my precious (Ballad of a Thin Man)

  • TheClash

    TheClash

    #2181781 - 13 years ago

    In reply to TheOx129, #52:

    NOw theres a song the Clash covered that I really did like.

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2181988 - 13 years ago

    Like I said, the White Stripes have some great Dylan songs. "One More Cup of Coffee" is great on their first ablum, and they do a great job of keeping it low-fi yet giving it some White Stripes flavor. They cover "Isis" and "Love Sick" live from time to time too, and its just the way a Dylan cover should be: basic live tracks that feel slightly original yet still hold plenty of that classic Bob feeling.

  • TheClash

    TheClash

    #2192232 - 13 years ago

    In reply to imbenurnot, #55:

    The White Stripes usually do pretty good covers of rock n' roll songs. Their take on Stop Breaking Down was really good at least I thought. Anyway, anyone else really like the album Slow Train Coming?

  • evilimperial

    evilimperial

    #2195223 - 13 years ago

    If you're talking about Dylan covers, Hendrix's version of All Along The trumps them all.

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2346378 - 13 years ago

    In reply to Adam14, #27:

    Alright, I've gotten into that album. It is amazing.

    By the way, anybody with even a passing interest in Bob Dylan needs to check out No Direction Home, the new documentary. It is incredible.

  • TheOx129

    TheOx129

    #2346524 - 13 years ago

    In reply to imbenurnot, #58:

    Glad to see you finally got into it. It's probably my absolute favorite Dylan album. It was the height of his "absurdist/surreal storyteller period" and he never made an album that sounded quite like it ever again. It probably had something to do with how popular music was sounding at the time (after his motorcycle accident), because while most bands were pushing popular music to its very limits, Dylan made "back-to-the-basics" records like John Wesley Harding and Nashville Skyline. And for every band that got the "pushing pop music forward" right (ie The Beatles, Pink Floyd, The Who, The Rolling Stones, The Velvet Underground, etc.) there were countless laughable "psychedelic" bands that sought more to sound as "out there" as possible rather than actually trying to push pop music forward.

    I also highly recommend the No Direction Home documentary and soundtrack. The soundtrack will probably even have appeal for casual fans, as many of the alternate takes are quite different from released versions. For example, the original take of "It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry" is much jumpier and faster-paced than the released version, or the alternate take of "Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat" was much more of a slow blues than the released version.

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2352889 - 13 years ago

    I've had Blonde on Blonde for a while now, I just never found it as exciting as Highway or Home. After revisiting it, though, I decided that I love it. "Rainy Day Woman # 12 and 35" has been one of my favorites for a while.

    Whats your favorite part of the documentary?

  • TheOx129

    TheOx129

    #2353767 - 13 years ago

    In reply to imbenurnot, #60:

    Hrm...tough question. I'd say either the part about his earlier days when he first came to New York City or the part detailing all the uproar caused by Dylan going electric. It was pretty funny when Al Kooper said that at one concert when they played "Like a Rolling Stone," the booing stopped since it was such a big hit and the audience sang along, but it immediately resumed once they finished playing the song.

  • RaoulDuke

    RaoulDuke

    #2354306 - 13 years ago

    I'm going to have the opportunity to watch "No Direction Home" in the near future, and I was wondering...how do you all think it compares to "Don't Look Back?" I'm a huge fan of that documentary...the music is spectacular, but what's more spectacular is how incredibly asshole-ish Dylan could be while still maintaining his magnetism.

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2354516 - 13 years ago

    Its a completely different thing. Don't Look Back is more of a film then a documentary. In No Direction Home, you see almost all there is to be known about Dylan. You actually get under the skin and understand what the man has been saying for years. It finally sinks in. He wasn't a topical songwriter. He wasn't this amazing folk singer. He wrote and sang because he wanted to write and sing. Plus you can see how he'd be pissed off at so many people. Having some random reporter ask him to suck on his glasses just for a photo op.

  • TravisBickle

    TravisBickle

    #2390287 - 13 years ago

    gyah, I can't believe I missed this when it came out. Some people don't have satelite, some don't have cable...I don't have TV. Period. I miss my pbs.

    This has to be awesome a) it's Dylan b) it's Scorcese. It doesn't get much better. I'm still sitting on "The Last Waltz" which I also desperately want to see.

    As to Dylan albums, favorite has to be Live in '66. It's also known as Live at Royal Albert Hall and it captures Dylan when he's straight up on fire.

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2390542 - 13 years ago

    "Who Killed Davey Moore" is the song that turned my onto Bob Dylan, along with "Ballad of a Thinman"

  • TheClash

    TheClash

    #2398587 - 13 years ago

    "Queen Jane Approximitely" is a great song, that and "Tombstone Blues" is another that really got my into Dylan.

  • The_Mailman

    The_Mailman

    #2400314 - 13 years ago

    Roadhouse blues by The Doors
    JIM MORRISON WAS A GOD
    all those who love The Doors say
    say: hell ya

  • TheClash

    TheClash

    #2400787 - 13 years ago

    In reply to The_Mailman, #67:

    Wrong thread, Bob Dylan > The Doors anyway.

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2401687 - 13 years ago

    Bob = 20 times the poet Jim was.

  • TheClash

    TheClash

    #2410509 - 13 years ago

    In reply to imbenurnot, #69:

    Bob = 20 times the poet Jim was.


    Its proven fact, at least in my mind. I mean Jim was a great poet, theres really no denying that but, but Bob beats him hands down without even a doubletake on the matter. He's music has influenced American music in general and not to mention he outlived Morrison. The Doors music was just an expansion on the psychedelic music of the time. Nothing truly revolutionary.

    In the End, Jim was good, but Bob was much better.

  • the_ghost

    the_ghost

    #2413902 - 13 years ago

    My favorite Dylan album is Bring It On Back Home. Some of the songs get a bit lengthy, but it's a great album nonetheless. The first part of the documentary seemed to be a bore, but the second part was much more exciting, as it showed more live footage. Bob Dylan is a great poet, that can't be argued. He just isnt writing like he used to, in my opinion. The songs he produces now are bland and don't keep me hangin' on. His last good album was Nashville Skyline, he experimented with country then he went off the deep end. With the exception of "Hurricane".

  • TheOx129

    TheOx129

    #2414250 - 13 years ago

    In reply to the_ghost, #71:

    I don't see how the songs on Bringing It All Back Home are considered lengthy, with the exception the surreal and amazing "It's Alright, Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)." But, I digress.

    I found the first part of No Direction Home to be quite interesting, actually. The environment Dylan grew up in (anonymous small town America) really had an effect on him as a future songwriter/poet. The stories some of his friends and fellow folk singers told are pretty humorous, as well.

    I couldn't disagree more with how Dylan has somehow "lost his talent." His last two albums, Time Out Of Mind and Love and Theft, are arguably two of his best albums from his entire canon of work. Sure, it may have seemed that the 1980's were a "dry period" for Dylan, but upon listening to The Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3, it became quite obvious that he kept some of his best stuff, like "Blind Willie McTell" and "Foot Of Pride," in the vaults. Of course, his poor relationship with his record label at the time really led to Dylan becoming more concerned with pissing them off rather than putting out strong albums.

    I find a good portion of his 1970's work underrated, particularly New Morning and Slow Train Coming. Of course, that doesn't change the fact that Blood on the Tracks was probably the best album he released in the 1970's.

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2417214 - 13 years ago

    In reply to the_ghost, #71:

    Desire was a fantastic album, with songs like Hurricane, Isis, and One More Cup of Coffee for the Road.

    I forgive everybody for anything they did in the 1980s. That decade seemed to bring out the worst of the industry, with very few exceptions (like Sonic Youth, The Violent Femmes).

  • theanswer7

    theanswer7

    #2419626 - 13 years ago

    In reply to imbenurnot, #69: You can't compare Jim And Dylan there two different types of music. One's folk and the other is psycodelic rock. Jim wrote about spiritual ideas and dylan about politics and life. There both great but there totaly different. Its like comparing who has better shot in hockey and basketball.

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2421715 - 13 years ago

    Dylan was NOT a topical songwriter! He wrote a couple, like "Masters of War" and "Only a Pawn in Their Game", but for the most part he just wrote. People just wanted to make him into this great politician, but he wasn't. In his own words, "They're just songs."

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2421719 - 13 years ago

    Also, he was more of a Rock 'n' Roll artist then a folk artist when his entire career is considered. He played acoustic music for about five years, but he's played rock for 40.

  • Maj_Shubaltz

    Maj_Shubaltz

    #2422144 - 13 years ago

    Ahh,
    Blonde on Blonde, Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands
    its the only song in that album that doesnt have painfull harmonica notes. It's not like I hate him and his harmonica, its just that my school band has a harmonica with an amp(yes, as in school funded band class, it sucks) and I sit right infront of his amp, I get really tired of his harmonica.

    But some of my other favorites are, "The Times, They are a Changin", and "Tangled up in Blue"

    TO tell ya'll the truth, I listen to Bob Dylan whenever im playing Medal of Honor, even though he was clearly anti-war. Odd eh?