Forums > Music

Bob Dylan

Posts (151)

  • TravisBickle

    TravisBickle

    #2429054 - 13 years ago

    I think it's funny that Dylan is undoubtedly one of the the most influential artists in modern music, but his record sales were usually pretty dismal. How can a man be so revered but so unpopular?

    As far as his best studio albums go, I'll say Highway 61 is the best...but my favorite is Nashville Skyline. It was such a curveball to the fans.

  • mattiecore

    mattiecore

    #2429452 - 13 years ago


    A great writer and good musician, but is often vastly overrated.


    ~DemoncF, #2

  • Haikira

    Haikira

    #2432780 - 13 years ago

    Dylans the man, Said what was needed to be said in the day. New Documentary about him is decent.

  • TravisBickle

    TravisBickle

    #2435012 - 13 years ago

    In reply to mattiecore, #79:

    do you care to explain?

  • TheClash

    TheClash

    #2470899 - 13 years ago

    In reply to TravisBickle, #81:

    People see him as the greatest and overstate his ability. Other than that he is amazing.

  • Vyce

    Vyce

    #2471383 - 13 years ago

    I sound like Dylan when I'm stoned.

  • TheClash

    TheClash

    #2504932 - 13 years ago

    In reply to Vyce, #83:

    Uhh.....thanks for the info man?

  • theanswer7

    theanswer7

    #2543349 - 13 years ago

    In reply to imbenurnot, #76: Dylan is Folk he followed in Gutrie and Leadbelly's footsteps. Dylan was playing folk when he was 12 when he was in the golden chords. He grew into other folk artists when he was in greenwich. Just because he played rock longer doesn't make him a rock artist. He is more famous for folk. And Dylan wrote about the government just look at his lyrics.

  • theanswer7

    theanswer7

    #2543407 - 13 years ago

    In reply to imbenurnot, #76: Acoustic guitar doesn't make it folk. Electric gutiar doesn't make it rock. Dylan played an electric gutiar on a folk song at a folk festival. BB King plays electic gutiar but thats not rock.

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2543942 - 13 years ago

    I'd hardly call the two main songs at the festival, "Maggie's Farm" and "Like a Rolling Stone" folk songs. However, we're both missing the point here. Have you seen the documentary "No Direction Home"? The whole concept was that it was futile labeling Dylan. He hated being called a folk singer or a topical songwriter. Thats what people did to him and their hearts were broken when he "sold out with a pop group! You pay to go see Bob Dylan, not a Pop group!" Dylan was neither. He was himself and he played what he wanted to play. Yes, he played folk music, but do you think that he wants to be a folk singer? From the man himself: "An artists should never get to a place where he is comfortable."

  • TravisBickle

    TravisBickle

    #2551257 - 13 years ago

    In reply to theanswer7, #85:

    But couldn't you say that Dylan brought meaning to Rock and Roll? Prior to Bringin' It All Back Home, rock as a genre was akin to the pop music of today. Maybe catchy but hardly deep. Dylan changed that perspective, rock could rock you socks and say somthing.

  • RaoulDuke

    RaoulDuke

    #2551513 - 13 years ago

    In reply to TravisBickle, #88:

    My dad always talks about how Dylan made rock okay for non-teenieboppers to listen to. He gave the music gravitas, social relevance, et cetera. So, uh...ditto, I guess.

  • RaoulDuke

    RaoulDuke

    #2551534 - 13 years ago

    In reply to theanswer7, #86:

    Bob Dylan was booed the second he brought an electric guitar into the mix. Pete Seeger threatened to take an axe to the power line. In bootleg recordings, you can clearly hear someone yell "JUDAS!" as Dylan starts his set. I agree with imbenurnot - it's completely futile to label Dylan...you only show your own closed-mindedness in doing so.

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2552619 - 13 years ago

    In reply to TravisBickle, #88:

    Yeah, exactly. People were so pissed when he started playing with a poppy back-up group (I have no idea how you could call Mike Bloomfield's playing poppy. He is one of the most intense guitarists that I've ever heard). I would hardly call songs like "Subterranian Homesick Blues," "Maggy's Farm," "Outlaw Blues," "Bob Dylan's 115th Dream," "Like a Rolling Stone," "Tombstone Blues," "From A Buick 66," Ballad of a Thinman" (one of my favorites of all time), "Highway 61 Revisited," pop music. If you want to hear pop from the era listen to The Byrds' "Mr. Tambourine Man" (nothing against the Byrds).

  • TheClash

    TheClash

    #2553001 - 13 years ago

    In reply to imbenurnot, #91:

    I agree, Dylan's music in the mid-sixties with the introduction of the electric guitar was amazing, I loved his acoustic but the electric brought alot to the table. Subterranina Homesick Blues is an amazing song.

  • TravisBickle

    TravisBickle

    #2555946 - 13 years ago

    In reply to RaoulDuke, #90:

    That recording is on Live at "Royal Albert Hall" and it is Dylan spitten the red hot fire, mon. Seriously, that album is my favorite Dylan recording ever, it's what got me started. Immediately after "JUDAS!", Dylan turned to the band (actually The Band) and said "play fucking loud!". With the rarely used epithet, the band launches into Like a Rolling Stone and it gives me goosebumps evertime.

  • Play3r_1

    Play3r_1

    #2556312 - 13 years ago

    First concert I ever went to was a few years ago in OK City...Bob Dylan. Not the best in concert and not the best voice, but I like his lyrics...

  • theanswer7

    theanswer7

    #2571533 - 13 years ago

    In reply to Play3r_1, #94: Yea Dylan has a terrible voice but you don't listen to him for the voice, you listen for the powerful lyrics.

  • TheClash

    TheClash

    #2575751 - 13 years ago

    In reply to theanswer7, #95:

    No, Neil Young has a terrible voice, Dylans isn't really that bad. Its more of a groaning blues type.

    PS Neil Young still rocks, just not a good singer.

  • MustyMung

    MustyMung

    #2575996 - 13 years ago

    In reply to TheClash, #96:

    oooo you caused my hand to twitch with that one. I don't think you can say Neil has a terrible voice, any more than you can say Bob Dylan does. I find the unique sound of his voice to be one of the better parts of his music. Not that he isn't one of the greatest rock song writers of... ever, but i do think that without his voice his music wouldn't be half as phenominal as it is.

    And, since we're talking about good ol' Neil, I've got to say that as far as the more recent efforts from Neil and Bob, Neil's been putting out more consistent, and better all around discs in these later years. I still like Dyllan's newer albums, but they don't seem to pack as much of a punch as Neil's still do. Also, i haven't seen Bob Dylan in concert, and i cry a little inside every time i think of that, but i hear that lately he just hasn't been putting on good shows. And when i saw Neil Young with the Pretenders, i though that he rocked out.

  • RaoulDuke

    RaoulDuke

    #2576018 - 13 years ago

    In reply to MustyMung, #97:

    I thought that Dylan's "Love and Theft" was a pretty damn good album...although I'd have a hard time disagreeing with the fact that Young has had better output as of late.

  • TravisBickle

    TravisBickle

    #2576025 - 13 years ago

    In reply to MustyMung, #97:

    I saw him at a festival, and people were literally laying down and sleeping during his performance. I also saw him at a convention center and it was equally bad. I won't say I was dissappointed, because it's freaking Dylan, but I've found him to be a shell of the performer he once was.

    But c'mon, the guys like 60something.

  • Marzer

    Marzer

    #2579783 - 13 years ago

    Dylan rules. he was a political machine

  • TheClash

    TheClash

    #2581303 - 13 years ago

    In reply to Marzer, #100:

    Though he up and down denies it as being politically driven music, as he said "its a just songs, nothing more"

    The guy wasn't all that people made him out to be as this politically minded person, he was an amazing lyricist nonetheless. But the lyrics weren't really reflective of his centralized ideals as a person.

  • imbenurnot

    imbenurnot

    #2585133 - 13 years ago

    He HATED being called a topical songwriter. He hated his songs being called protest songs. He sang what was on his mind. Nothing more. He had no desire to be labeled the voice of a generation.