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Volume 5 was the best Volume of RWBY

Posts (55)

  • CPY98

    CPY98 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    #33738743 - 1 month ago

    In reply to WrightKnight I appreciate all your insights, but honestly, I feel like the whole "Contract With the Reader" idea is more what you'd call guidelines than an actual contract

  • WrightKnight

    WrightKnight

    #33738756 - 1 month ago

    In reply to CPY98

    Ah yes, take the term literal to attempt to invalidate it.  "Contract With The Reader" is just the term Orson Scott Card used to call to point a key issue that ALL authors who want to publish have to deal with: the advertising side of things.  In its essence, you have to finish the core narrative you started with.  Sure, you CAN go to the other core narratives, but you DO have to finish what you started.  He likened it to rolling a boulder down a mountain.  No matter what else happens on the way, you need to see the boulder come to a stop at the bottom.  On a grander scale, it is simply "don't lie or mislead about what your core narrative actually is".  RWBY presented itself as a Character narrative, then abruptly switched to the Event narrative three seasons in, pushing the Character to the background.  And I see no indication that it will go back anytime soon.  So in this, they violated that concept.  And again, since it speaks of the advertising side, it is something that all authors WILL be dealing with, whether they want to or not, whether they know about it or not.

  • spoolofwhool

    spoolofwhool

    #33738763 - 1 month ago

    In reply to WrightKnight

    Yeah, that's one of my biggest issues with Rwby's advertising right now because this was, and still is, the show description:

    "The future-fantasy world of Remnant is filled with ravenous monsters, treacherous terrain, and more villains than you can shake a sniper-scythe at. Fortunately, Beacon Academy is training Huntsmen and Huntresses to battle the evils of the world, and Ruby, Weiss, Blake, and Yang are ready for their first day of class."

    At this point in time, not a very accurate description of the story anymore. It doesn't even hint at what has happened to it. Sounded like it would just a slice of life of them enjoying their term at Beacon, not some crazy world-saving adventure.


  • WrightKnight

    WrightKnight

    #33738768 - 1 month ago

    In reply to spoolofwhool

    Nominally, you'd get a chapter (with a novel or other written work), or the first ten minutes (for a movie), or the first few episodes (for a TV show....or a web-series) to establish what the core narrative is going to be.  But with the various advertising routes available to authors now, the Contract can be established as early as the commercials for the work.  This is part of why Firefly ultimately failed: FOX chose to cut the commercials in a way that sold the show as a sci-fi comedy, when that was definitely not the main narrative genre.  There was certainly a degree of humor, but is was not the type of humor that was actually in the show, so the ads effectively lied about the kind of show that Firefly was, so it turned off a decent portion of the viewer-base.

    You are right: what is advertised is effectively "happy-go-lucky Soul Eater", and that was what the show was for 2 1/2 seasons.  Emphasis on WAS.

  • spoolofwhool

    spoolofwhool

    #33738772 - 1 month ago

    In reply to WrightKnight

    Interesting. I never knew that about Firefly. Makes sense that it was received more poorly then, unlike when I watched it where I had been told in advance that it was like sci-fi action drama.