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How Many Degrees In A Sphere?

Posts (131)

  • reedmon29

    reedmon29

    #743011 - 14 years ago

    In reply to TheDarksage, #29:

    You cannot use degrees for squares, leading me to beleif that it isn't 360 degrees in a circle.
    Say what? Degrees are for circles. A sphere is a 3D circle. Why? Because a circle is a graph equidistant from a point. A sphere is also a graph equidistant from a point. Cylinders and cones don't fit that definition, so they are exempt from the degrees.

    Surface area for a cube is 6 * B * H. That doesn't work for rectangles, though. Does that make it untrue? Heavens no. Cones are Pi * R sub B ^ 2 * H / 3. That only works for cones.

    Also, it isn't 360 * 360. I used that proof to demonstrate that my original hypothesis was incorrect. It is 360 * 360 / Pi.

    But, anyhow, you cannot use that proof for other 3D objects because every object other than a sphere or 3D version of a elipse is that they all have a flat side of some kind. How many degrees are there in a square?

  • reedmon29

    reedmon29

    #743029 - 14 years ago

    Wow... I didn't realize this had gotten to two pages...

    In reply to Vendor, #32:

    Meteres per second squared is a unit of acceleration.

    Yes, but have you ever seen them? I said that in referance to tyguy101a, who said that there was no such thing as a square degree. Things exist mathematically if you use the correct formulas. A Newton times a Meter is a Watt, if I remember correctly.

    In reply to TheDarksage, #40:

    How about this... the "point" of a cone is actually a circle also with an infinitely small radius.... A cone and a sphere in my opinion are two of the same kind of 3d object...


    Where do points come in? There are infinite points on any dimension other than 1D. Infinite points on a line, infinite points on a plane, and infinite points in a 3D system. They are absolutely useless.

    In reply to TheDarksage, #40:

    I thought it was pretty obvious that it was collected from another site... in any case... math is not all about facts... it is about theory and conjectures... but whatever you want to say.

    Prove to me that a point of a cone is not a circle with an infinitely small radius.


    Theories and conjectures come into play in much more advanced math. I wrote a mathematical proof about the math in question, so that shows that it is not a theory or conjecture. It was mathematically shown.

    Infinitely small? That's 0. Besides, that's a tautalogy, since a cone comes to a point. If it didn't, it would be a... something. Not a cone, that's for sure. But what does it matter?

    In reply to Vendor, #49:

    That's the problem with debating with a MOD... everyone assumes that they are correct. They may be, but they aren't nessesarily correct.

  • Vendor

    Vendor

    #743138 - 14 years ago

    In reply to reedmon29, #52:

    A newton times a meter is a joule. A joule per second is a watt.


    I think, I havent' worked with conservation of energy in physics for several months.

  • MaxWalrus

    MaxWalrus

    #743157 - 14 years ago

    There are infinite circles in a sphere, and thus infinite degrees.

  • Vendor

    Vendor

    #743193 - 14 years ago

    In reply to MaxWalrus, #54:

    There is infinite stupidity in this forum, this, no answer is valid. Not even the correct one.

  • redcrow

    redcrow

    #743288 - 14 years ago

    In reply to TheCheat, #38:

    that is english ur just dum u should hav payed attention in math

  • redcrow

    redcrow

    #743302 - 14 years ago

    actually there can be the 32 squared amount of degrees because there would be 360 possible places for the horizontal circle nd 360 degrees to rotate the vertical circle
    if u dont kno wat circles im talking about look up on page two to find my other post

  • redcrow

    redcrow

    #743356 - 14 years ago

    no wait i meant 360 squared in that last post
    plus i think thats wrong but u do neat two lines to intersect to find one point which in this case would be one degree so it could be 360 squared or just 360 because a sphere is basically a circle rotated 360 degreesbut from the center of the circle there would be 360 squared lines that would come from it arriving where a verticle degree meets a horizontal degree so it could be 360 squared truthfully i would take both 360 degrees nd 360 squared nd decide which one r teacher wants or giv him/her both

  • reedmon29

    reedmon29

    #743374 - 14 years ago

    In reply to redcrow, #58:

    If you write a long post like that (Actually, any post), periods help.

    Anyhow, 360 ^ 2 doesn't work, since that counts the two axis points 359 extra times each. Using replacement, I found that it is really something like 360 ^ 2 / Pi, but that's apparently up for debate.

  • otto

    otto

    #743719 - 14 years ago

    Its 360 x 180 just so you know.

  • Vendor

    Vendor

    #743862 - 14 years ago

    In reply to otto, #60:

    Show your research, asshole.

  • TheDarksage

    TheDarksage FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    #743918 - 14 years ago

    In reply to reedmon29, #52:

    You apparenly didn't read everything up until now... Go back and try again.

  • TheDarksage

    TheDarksage FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    #743922 - 14 years ago

    In reply to otto, #60:

    My ass has now been handed to me?

  • otto

    otto

    #744142 - 14 years ago

    In reply to TheDarksage, #63:

    No, I was responding to everyone trying to figure out what you would multiply by 360. It would be 180 because you only need to rotate the circle half way to cover cover all the degrees.

    This wole question is a not really going to lead to much. Nobody is going to agree on an answer, and even if an answer did exist that everyone could agree on, it would still not really be relavant to anything. Some people will argue the correct answer is a number value, and some will argue that an answer can only be described by a formula, and some will argue it does not exist.

    You said in a pervious post that a sphere is a series of circles creating a 3D object, so lets look at this from that point of view.. A circle is 360 degrees. If you take a series of 180 degrees of those circles, you will get a sphere. 360 degrees multiplied by a 180 degree series equals 64800.

    As for your other post, dont plagiarize other peoples work and give no indication at all that it is not your own writing.

  • otto

    otto

    #744143 - 14 years ago

    In reply to MaxWalrus, #54:

    There are infinite points in a circle too, so does a circle also have infinite degrees? No Virginia, it doesnt.

  • otto

    otto

    #744147 - 14 years ago

    In reply to TheDarksage, #62:

    I think he makes some good arguments. Maybe you should go back and try again?

  • otto

    otto

    #744164 - 14 years ago

    In reply to otto, #64:

    Sorry for so many posts

    To edit where I said how many degress, there are 64800 square arc degrees in a sphere, or 41252.96 square degrees.

  • reedmon29

    reedmon29

    #744501 - 14 years ago

    In reply to TheDarksage, #62:

    Your point recently has been that since other 3D objects cannot be measured in square degrees, a sphere must not be able to as well. You also said that a cone comes to a point at the point, which is true and completely irrevelant.

    No 2D objects, circles aside, can be measured in degrees. Sure, circular arcs can be, but only the arc of the circle. Since no 2D object, circles aside, can be measured in degrees, does that mean that every 2D object cannot be? No, circles, and only circles, can be measured in degrees. 2 * Pi * R = 360 degrees. If you have a forumula for perimeter that involves a radius as part of the forumula, feel free to replace that with it. But only circles involved radiuses.

    Now, in 3D it becomes a bit easier. The surface area of a cone is Pi * R * L + Pi * R ^ 2. So, although we cannot simplify the latter, the former becomes 180 degrees * L. Does that help us in any way? Not at all. That's why no one ever does that.

    Now, as for the point, as I said, that is irrevelant. Any circular concept is a circle. You wave your hand in a circle, and you completed a 360 degree arc. Your hand was 3D, but you moved it in a 2D direction. As for the point on a cone, yes, it can be measured as a circle with 0 radius. But, I can take a line down my yard and find how many feet there are. It doesn't help me find the square feet-age.

  • procrastin8r

    procrastin8r

    #744848 - 14 years ago

    i get to study this in a year or two, and i'm only a freshman in high school (prepares poison)

  • redcrow

    redcrow

    #745188 - 14 years ago

    In reply to procrastin8r, #69:

    it sux trust me im in eigth nd i already did this stuff in geometry were now moving into ratios how boring

  • procrastin8r

    procrastin8r

    #745733 - 14 years ago

    In reply to redcrow, #70:

    have you done sin, cos, tan, basic triginometry yet?

  • procrastin8r

    procrastin8r

    #745734 - 14 years ago

    In reply to procrastin8r, #71:

    you see, i'm two years ahead as well, i think this info on radians in space is in pre-cal/trig. (next year for me!)

  • procrastin8r

    procrastin8r

    #745735 - 14 years ago

    In reply to procrastin8r, #72:

    for christs sake i have seniors in my class (apparently they are dumb)

  • procrastin8r

    procrastin8r

    #745737 - 14 years ago

    In reply to otto, #67:

    you measure circle with Steradians

  • procrastin8r

    procrastin8r

    #745738 - 14 years ago

    In reply to procrastin8r, #74:

    sorry for so many posts