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Airplane makes emergency landing on...

Posts (14)

  • R3V3NG3_007

    R3V3NG3_007

    #303847 - 14 years ago

    Click here for pictures I took

    These collection photographs were taken after a plane was moved off Highway 933. The pilot had to make an emergency landing due to engine troubles around 1 P.M. Tuesday, December 14th, 2004, and used 933 as a runway to land the plane. Amazingly, the plane did not collide with any traffic, and had only severed a few power lines on its way down. The site where the plane is parked has turned into a tourist attraction. When I took these photographs, people were slowing down on the road and taking pictures. I even saw a car with an Illinois plate.

    This happened not to far away from where I live.

    P.S. Apologies if this has been posted before.

  • BigBen

    BigBen

    #304193 - 14 years ago

    In reply to R3V3NG3_007, #1:

    That was actually a requirement when they built the interstates.

    something like 1 mile in ever 5 must be straight and they must be at least 30 inches thick, so that if the soviets ever invaded america our piolts could use them as emergency runways.

  • Wizbang

    Wizbang

    #304210 - 14 years ago

    In reply to BigBen, #3:

    30 inches? Really?

    That's really thick.

  • rhino1045

    rhino1045

    #304215 - 14 years ago

    What the actual road had to be 30 inches thick. Talk about a waste of resources.

  • Wizbang

    Wizbang

    #304232 - 14 years ago

    In reply to rhino1045, #5:

    If that's what it takes to support a landing plane, I think the pilot would disagree with you.

    As I think about it some more, concrete isn't all that hard (well, relative to real rock). It probably does need to be that thick just to withstand the strain of traffic.

  • rhino1045

    rhino1045

    #304263 - 14 years ago

    In reply to Wizbang, #6:

    Where I live the grounds hard enough anyway so they just compact it then put a thin layer of road over it.

  • IrishRanger

    IrishRanger

    #305041 - 14 years ago

    In reply to rhino1045, #7:

    Packed dirt, no matter how hard, will not suport a multi-ton airplane.

  • Wizbang

    Wizbang

    #305051 - 14 years ago

    In reply to IrishRanger, #8:

    permafrost maybe. Not a lot of that in Australia, though.

  • BigBen

    BigBen

    #305056 - 14 years ago

    In reply to rhino1045, #5:

    even your average high traffic street is about 15-18 inches thick usually. Anything less and Semi's just tear it up. Besides once they built the higway's the havent ever rebuilt them, they just add another layer on top.

  • V8Tbird

    V8Tbird

    #308330 - 14 years ago

    Ya I've seen that before. Few years back I was staying with family in New Mexico, and on my drive in to Albaquerquie There it was, an 310 parked in the meddian. Guy had engine trouble flying over the sandia's and only place he could find to set down way the high way.

  • bdhutier

    bdhutier

    #308379 - 14 years ago

    In reply to V8Tbird, #11:

    never heard about that. but then again, i left there in summer '02, which is a few years ago, i guess.

    and Albuquerque ;P

  • CiQuat

    CiQuat FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Woop woop

    #308605 - 14 years ago

    In reply to BigBen, #10:

    While that's not exactly true - they often dig deep into the layers around here - that's generally the most common way of repair (resurfacing).

  • spam

    spam

    #308641 - 14 years ago

    In reply to BigBen, #3:

    In reply to R3V3NG3_007, #1:

    That was actually a requirement when they built the interstates.

    something like 1 mile in ever 5 must be straight and they must be at least 30 inches thick, so that if the soviets ever invaded america our piolts could use them as emergency runways.


    Actually, that's an Urban Legend.

    Snopes.com writes

    At no point was the idea kited of using highways or other roads to land planes on; the proposed landing strips would have been built alongside major highways, with the highways serving to handle ground transportation access to and from these strips.