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Posts (943)

  • mama

    mama FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    #30307743 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Maru, #825:

    I'm in pink on your map!

  • Rev_Pleb

    Rev_Pleb

    #30307744 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Maru, #825:

    I love that you had to translate the aussie song. It's like a second dialect here - i understood the lot.

    And as for the postvocalic 'r' - i had to keep remembering to include 'r's when i was over there. We hardly use them in NZ. My advice for speaking like a kiwi is, eliminate almost every 'r' and pronounce most vowels as a 'u'.

    For instance,(a favourite example)
    "Park the dark car in the car park" becomes
    "Puhk thuh duhk cuh in thuh cuh puhk"

    And i wish i was joking.

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307745 - 7 years ago

    Word of the day

    obdormition

    -noun

    Numbness of an extremity due to pressure on the sensory nerve.

    Obdormition (from Latin obdormire "to fall asleep") is a medical term describing numbness in a limb, often caused by constant pressure on nerves or lack of movement. This is also referred to as a limb "going to sleep," usually followed by paresthesia, colloquially called "pins and needles".

    Oh, so that's what that's called.

  • mama

    mama FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    #30307746 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Maru, #830:

    I've been working in medicine for over 23 years, auditing medical records. I have never seen this word. Parasthesia, pins and needles, numbness and tingling-all these I see on a day to day basis but never obdormition. I'm going to test my doctors now.

  • Rev_Pleb

    Rev_Pleb

    #30307747 - 7 years ago

    In reply to mama, #831:

    I'dlike to see their report card when you are done!

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307748 - 7 years ago

    In reply to mama, #831:

    My mother has been a nurse for 40 years and she's never heard of it either!

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307749 - 7 years ago

    Time for another:

    Word of the day! - Cause you need words to live!

    mulligrubs

    -noun

    (used with a singular or plural verb) Southern U.S.
    ill temper; colic; grumpiness.
    Origin:
    1590–1600; earlier mulligrums, apparently alteration of megrims (cf. migraine)

    Sounds like a smurf swearing. Also reminds me of shucks for some reason.

  • mama

    mama FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    #30307750 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Maru, #834:

    I have often been plagued by mulligrubs. Not pleasant. When afflicted by mulligrubs one is prone to hissy fits.

  • Kairi15

    Kairi15

    #30307751 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Maru, #834:

    that word makes me hungry....

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307752 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Kairi15, #836:

    Mulligrubs, you eat 'em!

  • Kairi15

    Kairi15

    #30307753 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Maru, #837:

    one of the many unanswered questions......what does a smurf taste like......*ponders*

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307754 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Kairi15, #838:

    Smurftastic!

  • Rev_Pleb

    Rev_Pleb

    #30307755 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Kairi15, #838:

    Bubblegum. I mean, so i've heard ... somewhere ...

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307756 - 7 years ago

    Smurf-Party-Food-Ideas1-275x300.jpg

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307757 - 7 years ago

    word of the day

    anglicism

    -noun

    1. a Briticism.
    2. the state of being English; characteristic English quality.
    3. a word, idiom, or characteristic feature of the English language occurring in or borrowed by another language.
    4. any custom, manner, idea, etc., characteristic of the English people.

    To 3: I don't know if you know but there are a number of anglicisms in German; some really old ones like the word "cool", some newer ones like "chill" or anything PC/internet related, or even grammatical peculiarities like the newest one I noticed, i.e. people often using a literal translation of "that's the thing" or "the thing is". Some people feel very strongly about these changes because they're "wrong" and I sometimes find them a bit irritating but in general I agree with what we learned in linguistics, that is, there is no such thing as "wrong or right" in language and language always changes and develops.

    Post edited 5/25/12 12:40PM

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307758 - 7 years ago

    Word of the day

    loquacious

    -adjective

    1. talking or tending to talk much or freely; talkative; chattering; babbling; garrulous: a loquacious dinner guest.
    2. characterized by excessive talk; wordy: easily the most loquacious play of the season.

    Loquacious sounds audacious. I am not loquacious.

  • Rev_Pleb

    Rev_Pleb

    #30307759 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Maru, #843:

    I have been known to be loquacious.
    My son is definitely that way inclined. I am constantly asking him if he is talking for any reason other than because he can.
    We refer to it as 'verbal diarrhea'

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307760 - 7 years ago

    On the same topic, today I randomly decided to try and talk as little as possible. A friend I spent all day in class with first said I wouldn't be able to make it very long and it would bother me soon. Later on it really annoyed him more than me. It was very funny. I think everyone else hardly noticed.

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307761 - 7 years ago

    Similar to anglicisms but reverse, today's:

    Word of the day

    Tor·schluss·panik

    -noun

    literally gate-shut panic

    The fear that time is running out to act, specifically in regards to a border closing.

    Even though it's a German word I never heard it before Burnie mentioned it on the podcast. With horrible pronounciation by the way. smiley4.gif And since then I think I heard it used once.

    Post edited 6/05/12 12:34PM

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307762 - 7 years ago

    I just wrote a journal/story in 50s style and learned a whole lot of new words.
    So today's word comes to you right from the 50s!

    Word of the day

    shuck I said shuck!

    -verb

    To cheat or deceive.

    Don't try to shuck me with your jive talk, man; I know what you're up to.

    All those shucksters are so square. All a bunch of phonies.

    Post edited 6/10/12 12:32PM

  • Kairi15

    Kairi15

    #30307763 - 7 years ago

    Aw shucks i didn't know you looked up words for us almost everyday! GOSH aren't you just helpful to expand our vocabulary!

  • Rev_Pleb

    Rev_Pleb

    #30307764 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Maru, #847:

    Get the shuck out of here

  • Kairi15

    Kairi15

    #30307765 - 7 years ago

    In reply to Maru, #847:

    You know now that i think about it i can't help but think that Goofy is a LIE!!!

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307766 - 7 years ago

    Word of the day

    mackerel

    -noun

    a food fish, Scomber scombrus, of the North Atlantic, having wavy cross markings on the back.

    The interesting thing about the word "mackerel" is that it's apparently related to
    1. maquerel/maquereau French for "pimp",
    2. makelaer/makler German for "broker"
    and the same in many other European languages.

    So what do a fish, a broker, and a pimp have in common? Do they all walk into a bar?

    Also, you probably shouldn't be asking for a "big mac" in France, if you know what I mean.

  • Maru

    Maru

    #30307767 - 7 years ago

    Word of the day

    sabotage

    -noun

    1. any underhand interference with production, work, etc., in a plant, factory, etc., as by enemy agents during wartime or by employees during a trade dispute.
    2. any undermining of a cause.

    The word might derive from the wooden shoes, or sabots, from the Netherlands, where striking workers would throw them into the machines.
    Another explanation is that it comes from the French word saboter, which means something like kicking and is also related to sabot.

    So when somebody throws a shoe at you he's literally sabotaging you.