So a little over two years ago, I posted this journal saying that I was finally starting the nursing program.

Here's me on my first day of Nursing school:

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And here's me on the day of my graduation:

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What. A. Difference.

I look like I aged more than 2 years between those photos, and damn does it feel that way, too. Through my experiences, I've seen and done things I never thought I would. I've helped both other people in countless ways, and I've helped myself, too.

In the two months since I graduated, I've been studying on and off for the NCLEX, a national nursing licensure exam. That exam is an adaptive test, which means that if you get a question correct, it will give you a more difficult one, and if you get one wrong, you get an easier question. It also has with a multitude of different types of questions to throw at you, like multiple choice, select all that apply, dosage calculation, hot spot, audio, etc.. In order to pass, the trend of your correct answers must fall above a certain percentage, but with it being adaptive, it's not necessarily 75% like a normal, multiple-choice test. The exam could be, at most, 280 questions over 6 hours. Mine shut off after 75 questions, which took me 1 hour.

I wasn't expecting it. 75 questions is the ideal. Either you did so well, you didn't have to continue taking the exam, or you did so horribly, there was no way you could recover. With the nature of the test, however, you eventually plateau at a question difficulty where you are getting every other question wrong. So you almost never know how well or poor you're doing.

Less than 48 hours later, I was woken up at 3AM by my mom, on the phone with my sister, screaming.

I passed.

I am now a licensed nurse.

Two or more years of schooling finally paid.off, and it's only the beginning.

Now I have to find a job. smiley13.gifsmiley13.gifsmiley13.gifsmiley13.gif

Love and hugs,
smiley12.gif Warpek