TheOx129

Male
from Palos Park, IL

  • Activity

    • *string of expletives*, etc.

      13 years ago

      TheOx129

      So, I think I might have lost my copy of Planescape: Torment, which sucks, because A) I had just started replaying it and B) It looks like it'll be difficult to acquire another decent copy of the 4-CD edition (it looks like future versions were put on 2 CDs). Oh, and it goes without saying that it's an amazing game that has probably the best story in any game, ever. If there's one game that proves video/computer gaming is a legitimate art form, this is probably it. Ah well, I know I didn't lose it in the move (A/N - Yeah, in the few months that I've been merely lurking on this site, I've moved into a new house and I celebrated my 16th birthday a few days ago, back on the 8th) and it's only been missing for about a week, so it's probably somewhere really obvious that I'm just not bothering to look in.

      Anyways, on top of looking for good music, movies, books, etc., I also search the Internet occasionally for some good games - freeware or otherwise. Like my music and movie recommendations, I think I'll start recommending freeware, abandonware, and/or indie games (with the occasional "mainstream" game). Of course, due to the legal gray area regarding abandonware, I don't think it'd be wise for me to link to sites, but there are a few big names out there that should be pretty easy to find on your own. And now with my first list of game recommendations:

      The Ur-Quan Masters - Basically a PC remake of the 3DO version of the classic hybrid-genre game, Star Control 2.

      Prelude to Darkness - While I haven't had a chance to really *play* it yet, I've heard nothing but good things about this freeware RPG. There are still reports of crashes and other bugs, but I heard the team behind it is working on fixing the remaining bugs.

      Ultima V: Lazarus - Okay, not technically freeware, but a massive total conversion for the now dirt-cheap Dungeon Siege 1. While DS was basically a poor Diablo clone, this TC manages to turn it into an amazing RPG (it is a remake of the original Ultima V, obviously).

      xu4 - Ultima IV: Quest of the Avatar was released in 1985, and is commonly considered to be the first of the so-called "Golden Ultimas" (the best in the series, IV - VII). I believe the game was released as freeware to promote the awful Ultima IX: Ascension (which came out back in 1999). xu4 is a program similar to Exult (which is for Ultima VII) - it provides an easy way to play the game on modern operating systems without the use of emulators such as DosBox.

      C-Evo - Civilization 2 has always been my favorite in the Civilization series (though I haven't had a chance to play Civ 4 yet). The only major gripe I had with it was the cheating AI. Essentially, C-Evo is a direct remake of Civ 2, just with a balanced AI.

      That's all for now, folks.

    • Intonation '06

      13 years ago

      TheOx129

      Last weekend, June 24 and 25, I went to the Intonation Music Festival in Union Park with a few friends. Overall, it was very enjoyable and I managed to snag a few goodies. Only one gripe, and that is that the microphones were shit. They were too easily distorted, and it made it impossible to decipher a lot of lyrics at the show. I was also accosted by a radical leftist that threatened me with military service (ZOMG!), which was amusing, at the very least. Oh well, at least the soundboard guys were much better than the ones at the Voodoo Music Festival. Here are my opinions of the acts that played, starting in order from the earliest to the latest:

      June 24

      Favourite Sons - Even with the shitty mics, I could decipher a few lyrics, and this seems to be a heartbroken band that plays rock music akin to the alternative scene's glory days in the early-'90's. Overall, a decent band that doesn't really bring anything new to the table.
      Erase Errata - I'm in a state of uncertainty regarding this band. They're a politically charged band that remind me of Romeo Void musically (with a heavier dose of the avant-garde).
      90 Day Men - I really didn't know what to make of this band. I've heard them described as math rock, and this would make them my first experience with the subgenre. I'll probably check them out more, though, as their music definitely intrigues me, at the very least.
      Devin the Dude - A humorous, often raunchy MC. Entertaining, at the very least.
      Jose Gonzalez - I'll be honest, here. I took a half-nap during his set. Otherwise, he vaguely reminded me of Nick Drake from what I heard.
      Chromeo - I, along with my friends, hated this band. They played horribly dated techno-funk, and tried to go with the P-Funk cheesy self-awareness look, but failed.
      High On Fire - Awesome stoner metal band. The frontman gets big points in my book for dedicating a song to Roky Erickson.
      The Stills - I'll give them a chance, but I outright slept during this set. I just got a "generic indie-pop" vibe from them.
      Roky Erickson - A triumphant return, to say the least. Even with all he has been through, he can still put on a great show. This was also his first performance in about 20 years outside of Texas (Austin, I believe).
      Boredoms - A brilliant avant-garde/noise-rock band, who had a vocalist that sort of reminded me of Damo Suzuki of Can. They also had a distinct playfulness in their music - something a lot of avant-garde/noise-rock bands sadly lack.
      Ghostface Killah - Overall, a great performance, though it sort of devolved into a talk about "bitches 'n' drugs" by the tail end of the set. Also, his DJ messed up a few times during the performance - it seemed he couldn't deal with Ghostface's loose (ie no "set in stone" setlist) performance.
      Lady Sovereign - She's got attitude, that's for sure. I'll probably look into her more
      The Streets - Couldn't stay for The Streets, so I won't render a judgment of any sort.

      June 25

      Tyrades - Loud, fast, angry punk rock. Another decent band that doesn't really bring anything new to the table.
      Bill Dolan - Backed by two other guys, he played some nice instrumental stuff.
      Panthers - Decent punk band with a vocalist that tries a little too hard. I might look into them a bit more, though.
      Constantines - A good hard rock band that I'll definitely look into.
      Rhymefest - A great MC that proves Chicago has an overlooked hip-hop scene (to say the least). Allegedly turned down an offer to work further with Kanye West in favor of going his own route. He also did a great freestyle during the show, too. I believe his debut album is coming out sometime in July, and I'll definitely be picking it up.
      Annie - Meh, I was never a big fan of dance music, so I wouldn't give a fair opinion here.
      Lupe Fiasco - I've heard his stuff described as nerd rap, and he really didn't do much for me.
      The Sword - Another wonderful metal band that is apparently part of the "retro-metal" movement. Others have described them as stoner/doom metal, but I'm no expert on the genre, so I couldn't confirm or deny these claims.
      Blue Cheer - Another great comeback, though Dickie Peterson's vocals have sadly deteriorated over the years. Oh well, they still gave a great performance.
      Jon Brion - He did some originals with some covers thrown in for good measure, from what I could tell. Still, he was a very good musician, and anybody who likes the Zombies is cool in my book (he covered part of "Tell Her No" and "This Will Be Our Year").
      Robert Pollard - He was drinking (tequila, from what the bottle looked like) and smoking while singing (nothing new, from stories I've heard). Still, he's a talented guy, and he had a tight band. He even let them jam for a few minutes at the very end, when he just left the stage.
      Dead Prez - A politically charged group, to say the least. They, along with Rhymefest and Erase Errata, provided most of the sociopolitical commentary for the music festival (from what I could tell, as I bring up the mic issue yet again). I'll definitely look into them more, though, as they've piqued my interest.
      Bloc Party - Didn't stay for them, as none of us really liked the group.

      Keep in mind this is all my opinion, and I hadn't heard any of the artists live before (or even heard of several of them, period). While there, I also picked up an Upsetters t-shirt, along with vinyl copies of:

      The Roots - Organix
      Thelonious Monk with John Coltrane - Thelonious Monk with John Coltrane
      Madvillain - Madvillainy Instrumentals

    • The (Almost) End of the Road

      13 years ago

      TheOx129

      Next week is Finals week, so I'm only one week away from semi-freedom. The AP tests a couple weeks back weren't too bad, but I found U.S. Government a lot easier than Microeconomics. It also didn't help that I had Econ first semester (it's amazing how quickly one forgets information), and there were a significant amount of questions on the multiple choice part and one part of a free response question that covered material that we never got to. Ah well, at worst, I'll probably just retake the class (and AP test) senior year.

      I do, however, have quite a bit of summer work for my two AP classes next year (English and U.S. History). The History summer work revolves around defining and stating the signifance of 100+ terms/people/etc., writing 5 essays (with accompanying visual aids for some), and reading a book from a list and completing a report on said book. I've decided to read The Autobiography of Malcolm X.

      The English work is comparatively smaller - I'd say smaller than the summer work for this year's class. You pick one book from two lists, and complete about 3 assignments for each book. I've decided to read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Death of a Salesman. They're both stories I've been wanting to read - and probably should've read already - for quite a while, so I guess I "win" in a way, too. Oh, and I have to have The Catcher in the Rye read by the second week of school, but no assignments need to be completed for it, as its a required book regardless of your other choices.

      I've also started reading The Ox-Bow Incident - this is purely for my enjoyment, though - and I'm enjoying it a lot so far. I'll probably be done with it soon, and then I can read V. - I've always been interested in further exploring Thomas Pynchon after reading The Crying of Lot 49 last year - before getting started on my summer readings for school.

    • Rififi

      13 years ago

      TheOx129

      180px-Jean_Servais_Rififi.jpg

      I know it's been a while since my last movie review/recommendation, but I've enjoyed a bit of down time recently. So, without further delay, I present to you guys my review/recommendation of Rififi.

      Although America "lost" many talented people during the blacklisting of the late 1940's/early 1950's, many of them moved to Europe so that they would still be able to work. One such person was director Jules Dassin, famous for making such noir classics as The Naked City and Brute Force. In his case, he moved to France so he would be able to continue making films.

      In 1955, Dassin made his masterpiece - Du rififi chez les hommes, or Rififi for short. The film centers around a group of four men planning and executing the perfect heist. The leader is Tony le Stephanois, a middle-aged man who has recently been released from prison and seems to be getting "too old" for the criminal life. Family man Jo le Suedois feels indebted to Tony because he believes that Tony took the fall for him by going to prison (instead of Jo, that is). Mario Ferrati comes to both of them, proposing a heist of a jewelry store. Although Tony seems reluctant at first, he eventually agrees to take the job. The fourth and last member of the group is the safecracker Cesar le Milanais (played by Dassin, actually).

      As the movie progresses, we see the four develop the "perfect" plan to carry out the heist. We also get to see a little subplot emerge regarding Tony and a former lover of his. Perhaps the most famous part of the film is the half-hour long heist sequence, in which there is not a single word uttered. After the heist is carried out, we see everything fall apart because of very human failings - the plan for the heist is technically perfect. That element is perhaps the most fascinating one in the entire film. At the very least, it's a far cry from your typical heist film in which some deus ex machina occurs - usually during the heist - and all the "bad guys" involved get caught or die.

      In short, Rififi is nothing short of a film noir classic. If you like heist or crime films in general, this film is a must-watch. Or, if you tend to like human drama more, this film still won't disappoint. Highly recommended.

    • Oblivion

      13 years ago

      TheOx129

      Well, Ragnaviper asked why I was disappointed with Oblivion, and I think a journal entry was the best way to tackle my issues with the game. I think a big problem is that most people haven't really played it long enough to notice all the flaws of the game. My first impressions were amazing, but as I got further (and especially after I completed the main quest) the game - for me, at least - fell flat on its face. This is probably why so many reviews out there are positively glowing - most official review sites/magazines don't get to play a game for too long (also why would they criticize a game that's being advertised all over their site/magazine, and thus bringing in revenue?), so they make the game seem flawless, when there are in fact numerous flaws in the game. It's not really a "bad" game per se, but more a victim of too much hype and misleading advertising. Another thing is that this game was designed for the Xbox 360 - the PC version is nothing more than a 1:1 port. This means streamlining the game so the RPG aspects are more "console friendly" - let's face it, games like Fallout or Planescape: Torment wouldn't work well on a console. Consequently, the game seems a bit "dumbed down" for me, although I do own the PC version.

      Before I get into the game mechanics (the workings behind the scenes, that is), I'll get into the more superficial aspects. First and foremost, while Morrowind may have not given the player enough guidance (at least Arena and Daggerfall started in a dungeon with a basic "get out" objective), Oblivion gives the player TOO much guidance - there's nothing that you really need to actually think about. There are less "FedEx" quests, but the almost all the quests are A-B-C, with the exception of a few quests where you can actually approach them from multiple angles. Another problem is that the game basically forces you to increase minor skills. For example, even as a warrior, you're going to need to either pick locks or open them magically - a "bash" option (like say, in Ultima VII) would've been really nice.

      However, the majority of the game's problems lie within its mechanics. The first thing you'll notice is that, without a certain .ini modification, you can't kill ANY quest essential "named" NPCs (even for the most minor quest). I heard somewhere that this makes 30% of the game's named NPCs unkillable. Maybe not a major problem, but it sort of kills the immersion factor. The biggest problem, however, is with the absolutely terrible implementation of the level scaling system. Essentially, the game makes ALL NPCs the same level as you. Numerous RPGs have used it (Diablo, not to mention the last two Elder Scrolls games), but what makes Oblivion's implementation so bad is that is scales everything - loot included. This means that, at level 2 or 3, even with an extremely hard lock, the chest may only contain 20 gold pieces (I believe they're called septims) and a rusty iron dagger. At higher levels, it also leads to such implausible situations as bandits having some kickass armor on them. Luckily, us PC users can download mods that fix the scaling system as much as possible (I believe Oscuro's Oblivion Overhaul fixes it the most).

      Now, I could mention some other problems (the ridiculous Persuasion mini-game, anyone?), but I think some fault lies with me. I was expecting an incredibly deep RPG, but what I got was a good action/adventure/exploration game with ultimately inconsequential RPG elements. Was it worth my money? I'd say yes, but I bought a game that I wasn't expecting to buy. Also, Bethesda's "pay mods" wouldn't be so bad if A) they actually, you know, released a patch beforehand (I believe a recent controversy is that they're releasing a patch you must indirectly pay for with the Wizard's Tower pay mod) and B) possibly withheld material from the game to later commercially release it (the Orrery, anyone?).

    • What Condition My Condition Is In

      13 years ago

      TheOx129

      As some of you may or may not have noticed, I haven't really been on this site for quite a while. This is primarily due to the fact that the school year is coming to a close, and my teachers are trying to cram in whatever they can. Anyway, here's a status update, by subject:

      Health: A poster/portfolio detailing LSD (effects, history, etc.) is due April 24.

      Honors Geometry: Nothing much here, though preparation for the final is probably going to begin soon.

      Spanish 3: Now we're really getting into the more difficult stuff. We just finished studying the imperfect subjunctive form, and now we're studying "ifs". Final preparation is bound to begin soon.

      Honors Biology: This class has been surprisingly relaxed as of late. Just finished with biotechnology, and I don't know where we're going from there just yet.

      AP Government: Finished studying the bureaucracy and the judiciary. Most focus has been on preparing for the AP tests next month (Government and Microeconomics for most sophomores, including me).

      Honors English: We've been breezing through Othello, which we have to do if we ever want to discuss/read Siddhartha. The final this semester is going to be a speech somehow relating to any of the works we read over the course of the year. My speech is going to be a comparison between Chivalry and Bushido - the Chivalry aspect being drawn from The Once and Future King.

      In the relatively little amount of free time I've had, I've been reading V for Vendetta, and playing a handful of games. The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion is simultaneously a highly disappointing title and a great one. Space Rangers 2: Rise of the Dominators is a kickass little Russian game - despite the silly name - that was lucky enough to get localized. Besides, it's selling brand new for only $30 - and that includes the original Space Rangers in the package. Sadly, you'll probably want to find *ahem* ways around the StarForce copy protection (which was a bad move on the publisher's part to use that) - as that stuff can really mess up your system.

    • Yojimbo

      13 years ago

      TheOx129

      yojimbo.gif

      If there's one thing that I always think is unfair, it's when "entertainment" (sometimes called "popcorn") movies often get shrugged off when compared to "thought-provoking" and "complex" movies. Contrary to the belief of many a moviegoer, it is quite possible to make absolutely brilliant "entertainment" movies. For example, see any of freelance director Seijun Suzuki's films that he made during his brief stay at B-movie Nikkatsu Studios (then again, Suzuki has always been incredibly skilled at taking the most cliché and otherwise unremarkable scripts often given to him and making great films from them).

      However, I think one of the best examples of a brilliant "entertainment" film is Akira Kurosawa's 1961 film Yojimbo. The film, inspired equally in part by American westerns and Dahiell Hammett's 1929 novel Red Harvest, is frequently credited to reviving the western genre (ironic, eh?). The 1964 film A Fistful of Dollars was also an uncredited remake of the film (almost directly scene-for-scene, which led to a rather infamous lawsuit by Kurosawa against Sergio Leone).

      The film takes place in 1860, after the fall of the shogunate and roughly around the time of the Meiji Restoration. Due to the rise of a middle class in Japanese society, the upper class (though the samurai in particular) has effectively been toppled. This leaves plenty of ronin roaming around the country, looking for some form of sustenance. The film centers around one such ronin, Sanjuro Kuwabatake (Toshirô Mifune), though technically the name is made up, making him the original "Man With No Name" (kuwabatake means "mulberry field", while sanjuro means "thirty years old").

      Sanjuro wanders around the countryside a bit, looking for work as a bodyguard (yojimbo). He eventually reaches a seemingly deserted town, before receiving a rather nice greeting in the form of a dog with a human hand in it's mouth:

      yoji_126.jpg
      Yummy!

      What Sanjuro finds out is that the town isn't deserted, but rather in the middle of a rather violent gang war. These two gangs - one led by Seibei, the other led by Ushitora - turn out to be equally rotten in Sanjuro's eyes, so he decides that the town would be much better off without either of them. So, rather than take on the suicidal mission of singlehandedly attempting to kill all members of both gangs, he decides to set them up against each other.

      yoji_144.jpg
      Sanjuro enjoys the view while the two gang leaders argue.

      As the film progresses, we see that Sanjuro enjoys his own personal code of morals. That is to say, he's definitely an antihero. He has some "bad" qualities, such as being a rather selfish and greedy person, but he also has "good" qualities, such as compassion and hatred for the dirty tactics both gangs use. In other words, he's a more complex character than your typical action/"entertainment" movie protagonist is.

      Overall, I think it goes without saying that this film is highly recommended. It's both action-packed and darkly comedic. It's very hard to underrate its influence on cinema, particularly the western (or, if you want to get more specific, the spaghetti western), even if you've never seen it. Not to mention the fact that it might be Kurosawa's most "accessible" film, at least to Western audiences, as it literally is a western set in 19th century Japan.

    • Stray Dog

      13 years ago

      TheOx129

      226660_thumb.jpg

      Although Akira Kurosawa has always been most well-known due to his jidai-geki (period drama) films, many people tend to overlook his films set in the modern era. Some of these films are easily his best, such as 1952's Ikiru, 1963's High and Low, and 1949's Stray Dog.

      Kurosawa, who has always been known to incorporate "Western" ideas into his films, tackled noir with Stray Dog. The film was heavily inspired by French mystery novelist Georges Simenon, who was most famous for creating Inspector Jules Maigret. In Kurosawa's mind, Stray Dog was a failure at a Simenon-like film, although he did warm up to it a bit more later in life.

      The film itself serves as both a detective story and as social commentary on the general condition of life in postwar Japan (one can also make a case for a coming-of-age film of sorts). Toshirô Mifune plays young police detective Murakami, who has his gun stolen on a crowded bus during a heatwave (the heatwave adds some extra tension to the film, as it almost seems to be a force acting against the police). Murakami is incredibly shamed by this, and the capture of the thief/thieves involved quickly becomes an obsession, particularly when the possibility that the gun has been used in a few recent crimes is introduced.

      Murakami is eventually assigned to work under senior police detective Sato (Takashi Shimura) to catch the criminal(s) involved. Sato primarily serves as a mentor to Murakami, teaching him how to act in certain situations, etc. However, as the film progresses, we find that in many ways, Murakami begins to identify with the person he's pursuing.

      The social commentary aspect is really a big part of what makes this film so interesting. We see plenty of veterans from World War II, just sleeping wherever they can find shelter. The general populace just seems to move about, completely aimless and anonymous. The people are struggling for both an identity and a more meaningful purpose in life. One might also say that Murakami's theft of his gun symbolizes Japan's virtual "emasculation" as a nation because of its defeat in World War II.

      Overall, many consider this to be Kurosawa's first masterpiece. It comes highly recommended, although one will have to put up with a bit of somewhat deteriorated picture and sound (not "bad" by any means, and Criterion has done a wonderful job of cleaning it up, but just as a slight warning). Still, it works wonderfully as both a detective movie and a social commentary on postwar Japan (and perhaps as a coming-of-age story).

      Also, I don't know why, but this film was pretty hard to review, as it's one of those films that one must see rather than go into lengthy reviews about.

    • The Sword of Doom

      13 years ago

      TheOx129

      swordofdoom.jpg

      Kihachi Okamoto's 1966 film The Sword of Doom (in Japanese, Dai-bosatsu tôge) is perhaps one of the darkest films in the chanbara genre. Okamoto, who also directed 1968's dark comedy Kill!, was deeply affected by World War II, and that led to his films often having darker edges to them. Even the setting for The Sword of Doom is bleak, as it takes place during the last days of the Tokugawa shogunate (or even the shogunate in general).

      The film centers around the samurai Ryunosuke Tsukue (played by Tatsuya Nakadai), who is easily one of the greatest antiheroes ever created. The film opens with a young woman and her grandfather, who are pilgrims, climbing a mountain and finally reaching the top. On the top, there is a small Buddhist shrine, so while the woman is off getting water for them, he is praying at the shrine. He prays to Buddha for death, as he believes his granddaughter is unhappy as a pilgrim. Lo and behold, Ryunosuke shows up, and asks the man if he is a pilgrim. When the man gives his answer, Ryunosuke brutally kills him with one cut from his blade. The old man has a bell on him, and it rings, unsettling both Ryunosuke and the audience. Ryunosuke then continues on, leaving the young woman to find her dead grandfather a few minutes later.

      The film primarily asks the question if humans are inherently evil. Toshirô Mifune, who plays a small but pivotal role in the film, claims that, "The sword is the soul. Study the soul to know the sword. Evil mind, evil sword." However, the opposing viewpoint is that Ryunosuke has been "corrupted" by the sword, because the sword has given him the ability to easily kill. The film doesn't give any easy answers, and leaves it up to the viewer to decide.

      As the film progresses, we don't know exactly what Ryunosuke is. He's an antihero for sure, but that's about it. He shows little emotion during the film (he only laughs perhaps two or three times, and each time is really eerie), and technically he only kills when he is forced to or when the victim actually requests death. Is Ryunosuke evil? Perhaps he truly is doing good, and acts as some sort of Angel of Death? Or perhaps he is simply driven insane by his deeds? Once again, the film doesn't give us any answers and leaves it up to us to decide.

      The biggest complaint people seem to have with the film is the ending, or lack thereof. You see, the film ends on a freeze frame, and doesn't give you any sort of concrete ending. A big part of this is because the film is based on an uncompleted novel by Kaizan Nakazato of the same name - Dai-bosatsu tôge, which literally translates to Daibosatsu Pass. Now, I'm not sure of the novel's ending (or should I say, what ended up being the ending), but the film ends wonderfully in my opinion. The film's ending gives the feeling that, even when faced with certain extermination, evil will always find a way to escape.

      Overall, this film comes highly recommended. The cinematography is once again wonderful, and additional props to the choreography in the fight scenes. However, this film is quite dark, so don't expect light viewing (but then again, the vast majority of the best films aren't).

    • Wilson Pickett 1941-2006

      13 years ago

      TheOx129

      I have just found out that Wilson Pickett passed away Thursday at the age of 64. He apparently died of a heart attack. A soul giant has left us...RIP "Wicked" Pickett.

      wilson-pickett.jpg

  • About Me

  • Comments (30)

    • MustyMung

      13 years ago

      Where you been, bitch?

    • Chewey_Delt

      13 years ago

      Hey, I just wanted to thank you for recommending Stray Dog a while ago. I just got it in the other day from Netflix and watched it and it was really, quite excellent. I normally wouldn't watch this type of film (or hell, even know about it), but I was really quite impressed. I was fascinated by the post-war themes, after having just weeks earlier listened to a friend's thesis on post-war Japanese art, and the way it was all weaved into the storyline.

    • Pip

      13 years ago

      my school is having a interview with jack thompson!!!!

      anything you want us to ask him

    • imbenurnot

      13 years ago

      The AP week has begun. I just took my two today. My brain is no longer solid. I hope yours go well.

    • EnterDaMatrx

      13 years ago

      You ever see this?:

      www.dimeadozen.org/torrents-details.php?id=79509

      Zappa with Pink Floyd. Looks interesting.

    • pimpman07

      13 years ago

      Hey, What's goin on. I need some votes,
      Go here to vote Flipdeck182 Mod Contest
      P.S. You can vote up to 5 times, so.......
      vote 5 times.....
      for me.
      I share.....
      If you don't like voting that's good also.
      just go to my pictures on my profile and laugh alot.

    • hayato1333

      13 years ago

      Intelligent and a good taste in music. So I figured I'd add ya.

    • aZn_SaVy

      13 years ago

      saxes baby

    • PostalMario

      13 years ago

      The FInals

    • PostalMario

      13 years ago

      For the Win

    • PostalMario

      13 years ago

      Vote For Me

    • ACDCROCKER

      13 years ago

      I have respect for,you but for some strange reason I completely don't like you. I don't know why. I don't think you've done anything to me. Still through all that I must say agian I respect you. Maybe in a past life (if one ever did exist) we clashed in some horrible way causing us now and forever never to be friends. It's just so strange, and I don't like not knowing the answer.

    • Wire

      13 years ago

      Wow Dead Like Me and Arrested Development on the same list. I've been watching a lot of both of those lately. Too bad Dead Like Me was cancelled after 2 seasons. Luckily Arrested is on its 3rd Season and I think it's still hilarious.

    • Governator1

      14 years ago

      MATTHEW IS ONE OF MEIN FAVORITE MEMBERS OF THESE FORUMS.

    • RileyDexter

      14 years ago

      You have great taste in movies!

    • DrGonzo

      14 years ago

      I'm checking in with all my comrades...so...

      how goes it?

    • Governator1

      14 years ago

      THE OX WILL PUMP YOU UP...

    • pink_floyd

      14 years ago

      nice pic of syd barrett, he only had 2 hits but he is still a dead set legend

    • aak2013

      14 years ago

      TheOx is cool. Respect him.

    • EnterDaMatrx

      14 years ago

      STONER!


      Have some class.

    • ArcticFox6i

      14 years ago

      STONER!

    • Wire

      14 years ago

      TAG! you're it, go here, it tells you how to play

    • b3durnk

      14 years ago

      I never, ever thought you were fourteen. You talk and know as much as I've only seen adults have. I'm honored to be your friend.

    • Razzy

      14 years ago

      You have amazing taste in (and knowledge of) music for one so young! =)

    • EnterDaMatrx

      14 years ago

      Holy shit, you like all the music I like and alot of the same movies....
      This is sooo freaky, and you live in illinios also. Are you my long lost brother?

    • DarkSpleen

      14 years ago

      hey man, i know you

    • Wire

      14 years ago

      When you have any Monty Python movie and Bubba Ho-Tep on the same list of movies, it's already known that the movie list is good.

    • Leus

      14 years ago

      Brazil rules. Bubba Ho-Tep is an entertaining movie as well.

    • Dinaden

      14 years ago

      Hey man.. just wanted to say, I love your taste in music(that you posted on the Forums).. good to see more young people into that sorta stuff =) If you actually are 14.

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