default_ex

from A room with soft, padded walls.

  • Activity

    • Glitching FFT

      3 years ago

      default_ex

      So I got bored and decided to glitch FFT, first print version since it's super buggy. Who knew Potion and Antidote were the super secret hidden classes.

      uc?export=download&id=0B9JipvAe87JVaU55M

    • Instant redstone computer

      4 years ago

      default_ex

      So I've been building out a computer using instant redstone techniques. I break every single function down into NOT-gate diagrams to optimize the logic to it's bare minimum. These have so many pistons that every piston shaved off the design is a huge performance gain in the long run.

      The entire thing is based around this instant repeater design.
      eKLDU4JDraUrBLNcKbfB6YDfUdmqhyQzUicXyQmf

      The instant repeater is just that 3x2 section in the middle. It's also an instant inverter and using pistons next to the diamond block allow jumping the signal over or down but not up.

      Using that diamond block for power and squeezing two next to each other forms one type of NOR-gate.
      LTQKu9HXRfpUjpKw9nrvq7bpst3xCGPmzmFPPrEw

      However you could just feed both inputs into the diamond block to have just one, it depends how you need it to fit really.

      So moving on the most important thing for building a computer would be memory cells. Even if your only building a calculator you need memory cells of some sort to hold your inputs and outputs.

      Originally I used gated D-latches. The logic diagram for one and a demo build.
      300px-D-type_Transparent_Latch_%28NOR%29
      TGEN9hT4nrtgf5_qTWl_2rrkKozx4vSP4NDjq1WJ

      A gated D-latch is very simple. When you flip the 'write enable' line on, it captures the value of the 'data' line. The captured value and it's inverse are what it outputs. This concept could be used for error detection so that you can build error correcting memory (ECC spec should work) but that gets really big really fast.

      Like this big for a single 16-bit memory cell.
      G85XQUQFzZRsWl7caFQbsdYFc1WxtIbyckxcms4_

      Now you really could use that design. The cool thing about these instant repeaters is that they work no matter how far they go, even in unloaded chunks.

      Here's 121 instant repeaters chained together.
      yuWztCljEhh27KwOARBwExImSuyXMshDR7CyL5z0

      Here's the delay on it compared to a single normal repeater.
      e6F8sNqkqAPwK0Ic-fXOj1uRt2lRl6u6pC34EnOF

      It's really glitches the game hard when you get a lot of those going at once. As you can see it's retracting and expanding the piston at once. This makes them glitch out for a frame while toggling state. If a signal hits one when it's glitched out it may as well not have hit anything to begin with. So that has to be kept in mind when building these things, all paths must be balanced for precise timing.

      Eventually I landed on the following memory cell design by accident.
      EfDhSNKz2M_jeFbcuxKUPwRHbFXte4GFH4LCLQ7r

      This works identical to a locking repeater except that it's instant and pairs up in multiples of 2 far easier than any other grouping. It's a simple concept. When the lapis block is down it's breaking the connection to the redstone block underneath. Power flows from switch to repeater. If you divert that signal while it's on and without turning it off, no block update occurs to let the repeater know it's not being powered anymore. It's very easy to trigger that block update so have to be careful.

      Without further adu. Here's a section of a stack of 16 bytes of memory (or 128-bits) using the above block (please don't) update cells like above. I've actually managed to expand this to 255 bytes per strip since taking the picture and reworked the design one a major way.
      HR2uTdo4cvQzYwStzJ3IbIHC_ZAWGGWHAuwR6RvE

      Each blue square down the middle row is one byte (or 8 bits) of memory. Along the bottom row you have the input routing. Lower layer delivers data and upper layer passes along the read/write pointers. Top row is the output line with the address decoder not finished (it is now).

      Here's what that looks like in operation with the decoders stripped away and command blocks popping redstone in and out of the decoder end points to simulate it all. I had to be able to see the delivery row to make sure it's working properly.
      wkgc_jtEBWXIauCnUxAdxSvB6VaajmYNsqkjhR2A

      That's not suppose to have missing pieces in the image, it's a side effect of pumping data in with a clock so fast you see the redstone wire flicker and pistons pop in and out of existence. Hella lag spike starting it up which resulted in a whole new approach using the pulses off instant repeaters instead of the repeaters directly.

      Oh... this is not all but I seem to have found the RT post size limit. This is just the tip of the iceburg, I'll have to prepare really detail images to display just what I stumbled on next in that design style, it'll blow your mind if your a redstoner that's used instant repeaters before.

    • 4 years ago

      default_ex

      It took an entire metal brush to get all the fine detailing done but I managed to shine the surface with a couple buffing wheels. Went over it with a sealing polish after I was done to protect it from all the gunk it'll be exposed to at work. To heat it I used a small copper core heat sink sitting on my soldering iron, surface got to just the right temp to soften up the surface enough for a deep buffing. It's really shiny now, as you can see it's taking on the colors around it like a mirror would, looks a lot better than the frosted look it originally had.

      3Kw56iFq5Z7k60IsPuwFHxjyxs7vxB7pOj6yj7wf

    • 4 years ago

      default_ex

      I just got this in the mail while at work yesterday. Was awesome to come home to. It's a licensed replica of Squall's griever necklace from FF8, thought it's about 10-15% smaller than an accurate replica. Unfortunately the only accurate replicas that didn't cost a week's wages were made of bronze or a bronze derived alloy. This necklace is a silver alloy, looks like silver, aluminum and plastic. I tried burning the plastic out of the metal over a spot in the back to see if I could make it shine with metal polish. It works but without a lot of heat, somewhere between 150C and 200C, it would take forever to separate plastic across the entire surface. Unfortunately my soldering station only goes 392-896C, 392C is enough to melt silver-lead and silver-tin solder so I'm sure it can melt silver-aluminum alloys too.

      kl9xH_s13eLUOd_83JCv97EJTea8Fa-NBJf9BlRF

    • Why did you choose your character?

      in Forums > Why did you choose your character? | Follow this topic

      default_ex

      This question is aimed more at people that play games that let you choose what race and class of character you play but I guess it works for choosing from a predefined selection as well. So why did you choose the race-class you chose to play? If the game allows customization down the line, why did you choose your customizations? Be it practical or ideological, I always found this an interesting question.

      To start things off I'll relate mine. I chose to play a Human Paladin in EverQuest that specializes on melee damage first and healing power second (everything else is just a bonus). I chose Human for practical reasons, they don't specialize in anything but instead balance out the base abilities. I chose a Paladin because I like the idea of a pious knight giving their all to help those around them. It's rare to find Paladins in EverQuest that specialize in damage at all because it's not really our role in that game, but I wanted to be able to lay down large amounts of damage really fast and that has quite a few times put me at the top of burst damage parses. Healing plays into the role of helping others, I carry around a bag of items which can be used once every couple of hours to greatly enhance my healing ability on single targets, nearby players and players in the same group as me. Those allow me when combined with other short term heal boost that work on any heal I cast allow me to heal up a player for nearly their entire HP 6 times a second or an entire group for 3/4 of their HP twice per second. Of course that kind of healing power on a class that's not suppose to be that powerful comes at a massive cost of mana, taking on healer role even for just a couple of minutes means I have no mana to do anything else with until we get at least 3 minutes of down time to recover.

      14 replies

    • 4 years ago

      default_ex

      Figured out the BIOS tests NB voltage during boot and disables ranges that will generate too much heat. Swapped the cheap ASRock aluminum cooler for a copper heat sink that reaches both chipsets and the PCI-e expander. Took a lot of butane in a torch lighter to heat it up enough to bend the heat pipes to fit the board but looks pretty good after polishing it with a dremmel and drilling holes in the fins above each chipset to mount 35mm fans. This heat sink setup has the nForce chipsets at unusually low temperature, half of what I normally see for nForce chips.

      I was right about suspecting a heat jump at 4Ghz. The CPU went from 40C under heavy load to 60C as I approached 4.2Ghz. There's also a significant amount of voltage droop at that frequency, as much as 0.04v, surprised the hell out of me considering I was seeing at most 0.016v previously. Normally I would clean that up with GTL Ref voltage but this board only has a high and low setting, need fine tuning for that.

    • 4 years ago

      default_ex

      As some of you may have seen me mention, my PC has a failing mainboard. Finally I gave into a little voice in my head that said: "Screw it! Push this thing hard!".

      So after 6 hours of tweaking and tuning in the BIOS.
      - The Northbridge was raised from it's factory default of 1.21v to 1.695v.
      - The FSB was raised to 425Mhz resulting in a CPU clock of 3.8Ghz (stock 2.66Ghz).
      - Surprisingly CPU voltage was only bumped to 1.3v, well within Intel's recommended range for it.
      - Memory was pushed 0.04v over it's rated maximum for 2.14v operating at: 5-5-5-15 and matched the FSB for 425Mhz (effective clock of 850Mhz).
      - No more Windows (7) loading screen, it pops right from POST to login.
      - All problems it was having are now gone save for a slight hiccup when the hard drives jump power states.

      If I could just push the NB a little harder I could get it to the 533Mhz mark to max out memory at it's highest performance profile of 4-4-4-12 @ 1066Mhz. Given the amount of play left in CPU voltage before I hit the Intel defined limit and the surprisingly low temps (topping out at 40C under heavy load) I'm sure the CPU would handle it. Unfortunately the BIOS doesn't even have an option to go over 1.695v on the NB, the heat is also approaching the upper limit of what an nForce NB can handle.

      If your curious what the CPU clock would be at 533Mhz on the FSB: 4.264Ghz. No idea if anyone has ever taken a C2Q that high on air cooling before. My prediction is that I'll see a massive heat jump around the 4Ghz mark, just like the jump from 30C to 40C at the 3.4Ghz mark. Still maximum recommended temperature on this chip is 70C, lots of room for play there.

    • Gaming records

      in Forums > Gaming records | Follow this topic

      default_ex

      What are some of the things you've pulled off in games which you felt you had to have broken some kind of record?

      For me one that comes to mind is that I managed to play through the main story of Star Ocean 3 without breaking the battle gauge. Had all of the bonuses active by the end of the first planet and kept them all the way through the final boss. Not even going to claim that was skill or any such thing, it was purely blind luck when I needed it most.

      11 replies

    • SteamOS beta

      in Forums > SteamOS beta | Follow this topic

      default_ex

      The SteamOS beta is now active for those that didn't know. However it is not for the faint of heart when it comes to Linux wizardry. I'll share my first impressions now that I've gotten it up and running.

      It currently only supports UEFI boot methods. It simply will not install on a BIOS system without some hackery to the SteamOS custom install method. This hackery involves replacing the GRUB boot loader images with ones that do work on BIOS systems.

      It doesn't ask you anything during the install process. The install starts and doesn't stop until it's done. There is no choosing where to install it, it will simply repartition whoever drive is your primary. You can get around this problem by detaching all other drives during install or modifying the install scripts.

      Since the SteamOS uses GRUB as a boot loader, like all other Linux systems these days, it's possible to add the boot option for Windows or any other OS without any serious trouble.

      Once installation is complete there's a post install script to run that cleans out any drivers your system doesn't need. Unfortunately for me that script falsely detected that I didn't need the nvidia driver leaving me to go through the pain of installing a Linux driver manually (as in no repository to fall back on for pre-made install scripts).

      The OS itself has two desktop environment. One is Gnome based, similar in appearance to the variant that Ubuntu uses. The other is Valve's custom desktop engine which looks and acts similar to big picture mode. It's not a bad desktop environment to be in except for a flaw I've yet to figure out, it doesn't display at the appropriate resolution so everything is a bit blurry. The Gnome desktop works just fine though.

      The web browser built into the Steam environment kind of sucks for anything other than basic web browsing. The enter key doesn't seem to do anything you expect it to do, in fact it didn't seem to do anything at all.

      I'll have to report back on gaming when a couple games finish downloading, shame it wouldn't let me recycle the folders from my Window install considering there is very little difference between Linux and Windows builds of Valve's games (data files are the same, executables and libraries are the only difference). Maybe they'll build a migration tool into the installer eventually, we can only hope.

      9 replies

    • 4 years ago

      default_ex

      science_shirt_1_1024x1024.jpg

      Does this conjure up images of Gavin for anyone else?

  • About Me

  • Comments (5)

    • Thiefree FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      4 years ago

      I like you, you're interesting.

      • default_ex

        4 years ago

        Thanks, wish more women found me interesting.

    • WindowsRules

      5 years ago

      Sorry to bother you like this, but I was wondering if you have seen my thread CHKDSK Shows "????" Instead Of Numbers - I could use your valuable insight on this.

      Many thanks

      WindowsRules

    • kanga110

      5 years ago

      You ought to get a profile picture :p

    • Xorda

      6 years ago

      You've never even seen any 3D content before, have you?

      You talk as if you haven't.

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