faceyourfear

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    • Big Brain Academy

      in Forums > Big Brain Academy | Follow this topic

      faceyourfear

      Big Brain Academy
      Believe it: your Xbox may be making you a smarter student, worker, and human being

      No doubt you’ve heard a parent, a friend, or a politician suggest that games are a waste of time, merely a mindless activity. I’d argue that games are exactly the opposite. Long, sometimes difficult console and computer games actually turn the acquisition of knowledge into pleasure - and it wouldn’t be fun without the learning. Whets more, the skills learned often spill over to the real world in ways you already use but don’t realize.

      Games often make you think like a scientist. Whether you’re selecting the right tactic for a boss battle in Gears of War, navigating a track in Dirt, or capturing territory in Command and Conquer 3, game play is built of a cycle of “hypnotize, problem the world, get a reaction, reflect on the results, re-probe to get better results.†that’s also a cycle typical of experimental science. Games also lower the consequences of failure for that cycle : When you fail, you can start from the last saved game or checkpoint. You’re encouraged to take risks, explore, and try new things. That’s crucial for creative problem-solving in the real world, too.

      But learning goes deeper in the best games. There, problems are well-ordered - that’s why we have lever design, after al - so that getting past earlier obstacles will lead to hypotheses that work well for later, harder problems. In these games, you practice a set of challenges until you’ve achieved mastery. Take Heavy Weapon on Xbox Live Arcade - first, you learn to target and move while blasting enemy aircraft. Before too long, the game throws a new type of problem at you - bombers that come at you with new attacks, satellites with different behaviors, and an end-level boss - requiring you to rethink your previous strategy and ratchet up your skills to a new level. In turn, that new mastery is itself consolidated through repetition (with variation) only to be challenged again by something new in the next level of the game. This cycle of consolidation and challenge is the basis of developing expertise in any domain.

      Along those lines, good games try to stay within, but at the outer edge, of the player’s “regime of competence.†that is, they feel “do-able†but challenging. This makes them pleasantly frustrating, leading to a mental “flow†state for humans beings. Flow occurs when people feel fully immersed in what they are doing; where they feel focused, energized, and fully involved. it’s a good place for your brain to be in general, and good games tap into that state of concentration very effectively.

      Games encourage you to think about not just isolated events, facts, and skills, but entire systems that incorporate all of the above. In games like Catan, Gears of War, of the PC strategy title, Rise of Nations, you need to think how each action you take might impact your future actions and the actions of the other people playing against you. Now substitute your game’s priorities for a monthly budget, a board meeting, or a romantic relationship.

      For that matter, games encourage you to explore thoroughly before moving on - to think laterally, not just linearly, and to use such exploration and lateral thinking to reconceived your goals from time to time. Those are good ideas in a world full of high-risk complex systems - whether that world is Cryodiil or Cincinnati.

      And while Xbox Lives tagline says “It’s good to play together,†that may be more true than the marketers know. Games recruit “cross-functional teams†just like modern high-tech workplaces. In World of Warcraft, each player must master a specialty, since a Mage plays differently than a Warrior, but they must also understand enough of each other’s specializations to coordinate. Same foes for Shadowrun, where Dwarves and Trolls use very different specialties in tandem to achieve a common goal. In both games, the core knowledge needed to play is distributed among a set of real people, much as in a modern science lab or high-tech workplace.

      All these features let you, the gamer, recruit good learning for fun - and noticeable results. Someday we may see the same methods adopted in schools, as educators explore benefits of gaming interactivity. Reading, writing and Rainbow Six could be the best way to learn.

      Originaly written by: James Paul Gee (Check OXM #75)


      so, what do you think?

      1 reply

    • Big Braing Academy

      11 years ago

      faceyourfear

      Big Brain Academy
      Believe it: your Xbox may be making you a smarter student, worker, and human being

      No doubt you’ve heard a parent, a friend, or a politician suggest that games are a waste of time, merely a mindless activity. I’d argue that games are exactly the opposite. Long, sometimes difficult console and computer games actually turn the acquisition of knowledge into pleasure - and it wouldn’t be fun without the learning. Whets more, the skills learned often spill over to the real world in ways you already use but don’t realize.

      Games often make you think like a scientist. Whether you’re selecting the right tactic for a boss battle in Gears of War, navigating a track in Dirt, or capturing territory in Command and Conquer 3, game play is built of a cycle of “hypnotize, problem the world, get a reaction, reflect on the results, re-probe to get better results.†that’s also a cycle typical of experimental science. Games also lower the consequences of failure for that cycle : When you fail, you can start from the last saved game or checkpoint. You’re encouraged to take risks, explore, and try new things. That’s crucial for creative problem-solving in the real world, too.

      But learning goes deeper in the best games. There, problems are well-ordered - that’s why we have lever design, after al - so that getting past earlier obstacles will lead to hypotheses that work well for later, harder problems. In these games, you practice a set of challenges until you’ve achieved mastery. Take Heavy Weapon on Xbox Live Arcade - first, you learn to target and move while blasting enemy aircraft. Before too long, the game throws a new type of problem at you - bombers that come at you with new attacks, satellites with different behaviors, and an end-level boss - requiring you to rethink your previous strategy and ratchet up your skills to a new level. In turn, that new mastery is itself consolidated through repetition (with variation) only to be challenged again by something new in the next level of the game. This cycle of consolidation and challenge is the basis of developing expertise in any domain.

      Along those lines, good games try to stay within, but at the outer edge, of the player’s “regime of competence.†that is, they feel “do-able†but challenging. This makes them pleasantly frustrating, leading to a mental “flow†state for humans beings. Flow occurs when people feel fully immersed in what they are doing; where they feel focused, energized, and fully involved. it’s a good place for your brain to be in general, and good games tap into that state of concentration very effectively.

      Games encourage you to think about not just isolated events, facts, and skills, but entire systems that incorporate all of the above. In games like Catan, Gears of War, of the PC strategy title, Rise of Nations, you need to think how each action you take might impact your future actions and the actions of the other people playing against you. Now substitute your game’s priorities for a monthly budget, a board meeting, or a romantic relationship.

      For that matter, games encourage you to explore thoroughly before moving on - to think laterally, not just linearly, and to use such exploration and lateral thinking to reconceived your goals from time to time. Those are good ideas in a world full of high-risk complex systems - whether that world is Cryodiil or Cincinnati.

      And while Xbox Lives tagline says “It’s good to play together,†that may be more true than the marketers know. Games recruit “cross-functional teams†just like modern high-tech workplaces. In World of Warcraft, each player must master a specialty, since a Mage plays differently than a Warrior, but they must also understand enough of each other’s specializations to coordinate. Same foes for Shadowrun, where Dwarves and Trolls use very different specialties in tandem to achieve a common goal. In both games, the core knowledge needed to play is distributed among a set of real people, much as in a modern science lab or high-tech workplace.

      All these features let you, the gamer, recruit good learning for fun - and noticeable results. Someday we may see the same methods adopted in schools, as educators explore benefits of gaming interactivity. Reading, writing and Rainbow Six could be the best way to learn.

      Originaly written by: James Paul Gee (Check OXM #75)

    • Ahhhh... sweet sweet friends

      11 years ago

      faceyourfear

      yay for my friend brandon. i love him now, i walked to his house today, which is like 10 km away, but i still did and i made it and i got to play halo 3 and its was amazing. even if none of my friends were on, it was still amazing. i missed it

    • OMG I DONT THINK I CAN MAKE IT!!!

      11 years ago

      faceyourfear

      AHHHHH
      ITS BEEN LIKE 7 DAYS!!
      OMFG!!
      I DONT THINK I CAN MAKE IT!!!
      7 FUCKING DAYS SINCE I LAST PLAYED HALO 3!!
      AHHHHH!!!!!!
      AJGHAEHFGIPAEWBF
      (then made this gehyyyyyeeh sound and it was really weird)

      GOD HELP ME!!!

    • FUCK, MY LIFE IS FUCKING OVER

      11 years ago

      faceyourfear

      FUCK FUCK FUCK
      I HATE RED RINGS OF FUCKING DEATH, FUCK!

    • Ok, wtf RT

      11 years ago

      faceyourfear

      seriously, did anyone notice that gus and geoff are the guys that are arguing about a passs word in the story line? seriously, i cant be the only one who noticede this. and the fact that RT didnt tell us, im offended.
      smiley5.gif

    • HOLY CRAP YES YES YES!!!

      11 years ago

      faceyourfear

      I TOTALLY HAVE THE INTERNET IN MY FREAKIN ROOM NOW
      WHICH TOTALLY MEANS, LIVE ALL THE TIME AND I CAN FINALLY UES MY COMPUTER. MAN, IVE BEEN WAITING DO DRILL A HOLE IN THE FLOOR BOARDS FOR SOOOO LONG, AND FINALLY, MY GRANDPA DOES IT. YAYAYAYAYAYAYAYA!!!!
      smiley0.gifsmiley0.gifsmiley0.gifsmiley0.gifsmiley0.gifsmiley0.gif

    • HALO 3 (YET AGAIN)

      11 years ago

      faceyourfear

      even though noone is even saying anything to me on any of my journal posts
      what ever
      i just wanna say
      HALO FUCKING 3 IS FUCKING AMAZING!!!!

    • HALO 3 (CONT)

      11 years ago

      faceyourfear

      holy fuck!
      i was sittin at my comp till midnight counting down the seconds til halo 3's release, the one second before it said 00 00 00, i was so ridiculously happy, and as soon as it said 00 00 00, i was incredibly sad, sad that im sitting here, not at a best buy, waiting for like 7 hours
      serioulsy
      im so mad that my mom wouldnt let me go to the midnight thingee
      fuck
      i have to wait about 18 hours till i get to play
      all you ppl who got your halo 3 at midnight, or 2 am, depending on how dumb you were
      i want to ask of you one thing
      plz dont flood the internet with the ending
      its really lame

    • halo 3

      11 years ago

      faceyourfear

      i just wanna let everyone know how much i wanna break into best buy and steal a copy of halo 3 right now.


      A FUCKING LOT!!!
      ARRRGGG!!!!
      smiley4.gifsmiley4.gifsmiley4.gifsmiley4.gifsmiley4.gifsmiley4.gif

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