romsca

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from Canada

  • Activity

    • 3 years ago

      romsca
    • 3 years ago

      romsca
    • 3 years ago

      romsca
    • Life is Strange Review

      4 years ago

      romsca

      Life is Strange gets better with each episode. It starts as a somewhat innocent seeming teenage-high school drama but builds layers upon layers as it progresses. A brooding, unsettling feeling is established very early on in the game. Not everything is quite right in the seemingly idyllic and sleepy Arcadia Bay, and not everyone is as they seem. Life is Strange explores the strength of friendship and the darkest depths of the human condition through the lens of an aspiring young photographer with a special gift that allows her to rewind time and try to do what we'd all like to: correct the mistakes of our past.

      The game offers a tremendous amount of content to analyze and ponder in a thrilling, riveting mystery-adventure format featuring a touching coming of age story populated with interesting, multi-dimensional characters. These characters are developed naturally, rather than with clich├ęd exposition found in lesser narratives. Even very minor characters have the potential for interesting development depending on player interaction. These characters are clearly not only a product of their births, but also of their experiences.

      Life is Strange conducts itself with minimal moralizing and recognition of the complexities of human nature. Critiques by reactionary misogynists seem to be unfounded as strong, sympathetic male characters emerge over time (somewhat dependent on player choice). All the while it explores the very real dangers and abuses women suffer by the hands of some psychotic, entitled and insecure men.

      Decidedly less 'feminist' concerns such as bullying, corruption, man's ignorance and hubris towards our environment, and how society marginalizes its ill are also tackled masterfully. Topics within science and mysticism are a recurring theme and are handled in a balanced, mature manner and seemingly without much bias.

      Equipped with a fantastic, fitting and seamlessly immersive soundtrack including Indie selections and original compositions from Jonathan Morali, excellent (for the most part) voice acting and a beautiful, handpainted feel to the visuals. Technical mishaps (most notably the lip syncing in earlier episodes - *now fixed in a recent patch*) have been vastly improved upon in later episodes.

      While still early, this could very well be one of the greatest games ever made and is definitely one of the strongest showpieces for video games as art. The unique impact of LiS could not be replicated by any other medium and shows how interactivity is critical to the poignancy and transcendent qualities of this artform when it is at its finest.

      Highly recommended

      *A couple of quick notes on EP 5 that I will rewrite into the review at a later date:
      + Two emotional 'grey' endings. Somewhat 'predictable' (I prefer to say 'foreshadowed' - how else would it end?). Thankfully no cop out 'happy endings' that insult the player's intelligence with a Hitchcockian explanation of the phenomena and choices in the game (juxtapose with the ending of the Hitchcock film 'Psycho' - the psychoanalysis). Could have really used a plant influenced ending though, clearly not watering the plant and letting it die should have turned the storm into a nuclear holocaust. ;)
      + Phenomenal art direction, particularly in the nightmare / penultimate segment.
      + Themes and philosophical content remained consistently poignant (lack of taking sides on religion / science, environmental concerns etc)
      - Minor quibbles with some of the antagonist's dialogue and actions near the beginning but developed well. Will probably resolve with further reflection.

    • 4 years ago

      romsca
    • 4 years ago

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    • 4 years ago

      romsca
  • Comments (1)

    • Sanders

      14 years ago

      Velcomin!

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